Search for: "sensors" - 477 articles found

Photo

Women in medical R&D

Innovation depends on more than just technical skills

Cécile Geneviève is one of the few women who lead research and development (R&D) at a major company and her increasingly female team reflects women’s growing interest in the field. But while gender balance is an important criterion, it takes a broad palette of skills to innovate to alleviate pain for millions of patients, she explained in an interview with Healthcare in Europe.

Photo

Deep learning vs Aids

AI app could help diagnose HIV more accurately

Pioneering technology developed by University College London (UCL) and Africa Health Research Institute (AHRI) researchers could transform the ability to accurately interpret HIV test results, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Academics from the London Centre for Nanotechnology at UCL and AHRI used deep learning (artificial intelligence/AI) algorithms to improve health workers’…

Photo

Support for T cells

Improving immune response against severe viral infections

Researchers have identified a way to improve the immune response in the face of severe viral infections. It is widely known that severe viral infections and cancer cause impairments to the immune system, including to T cells, a process called immune ‘exhaustion’. Overcoming immune exhaustion is a major goal for the development of new therapies for cancer or severe viral infections.

Photo

Cardiovascular disease prevention

An ultrasound sensor to measure pulse wave velocity and blood pressure

Nanoelectronics and digital technologies company Imec presents a proof-of-concept for determining arterial stiffness, a risk marker for cardiovascular diseases such as stroke and heart failure, and monitoring blood pressure. Imec’s approach uses an ultrasound sensor to measure the central pulse wave velocity. Measuring pulse wave velocity closer to the heart is also a more reliable proxy for…

Photo

Advanced care

This 'smart' wound dressing monitors the healing process with built-in sensors

Researchers at RMIT University in Australia have developed smart wound dressings with built-in nanosensors that glow to alert patients when a wound is not healing properly. The multifunctional, antimicrobial dressings feature fluorescent sensors that glow brightly under UV light if infection starts to set in and can be used to monitor healing progress.

Photo

Medication development platform

Smart biomarkers to find new drugs against brain diseases

Dr. Hayder Amin and Dr. Caghan Kizil from the DZNE’s Dresden site aim to speed up developing drugs against brain diseases through cutting-edge technology. To this end, they are generating an innovative technology platform, termed “i3D-Markers”, based on high-density microelectrode arrays and 3-dimensional networks of human neurons. Compounds to be tested will be dripped onto this setup, and…

Photo

Trimodal approach

Combining 3 techniques to boost brain-imaging precision

Researchers report that they have developed a method to combine three brain-imaging techniques to more precisely capture the timing and location of brain responses to a stimulus. Their study is the first to combine the three widely used technologies for simultaneous imaging of brain activity. The work is reported in the journal Human Brain Mapping. The new "trimodal" approach combines…

Photo

IoT in the clinical environment

The smart hospital: A place with ears and eyes

Andrew Gostine, MD, and CEO of Artisight, talked at the recent NVIDIA's GPU Technology Conference (GTC) about Artisight’s platform that allows hospitals to deliver improved organisational and financial performance by deploying an Internet of Things (IoT) sensor network to collect data and using artificial intelligence (AI) to analyse the gathered information in a way that is compliant with the…

Photo

Coronavirus disease biomarkers

New Covid-19 testing method gives results within one second

The Covid-19 pandemic made it clear technological innovations were urgently needed to detect, treat, and prevent the SARS-CoV-2 virus. A year and a half into this epidemic, waves of successive outbreaks and the dire need for new medical solutions — especially testing — continue to exist. In the Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology B, researchers from the University of Florida and…

Photo

Displays - Color

JVC - MS-S200

Highlights • Panel Technology: IPS • 1,800 : 1 contrast ratio • True 11-bit grayscale • ISD Support • Front and ambient light sensor • Remote management and calibration • Integrated power supply • DVI and DisplayPort interface • LED Backlight

Photo

Displays - Color

JVC - MS-S300

Highlights • Panel technology: IPS • 2,000 : 1 contrast ratio • True 11-bit grayscale • ISD Support • Front and ambient light sensor • Remote management and calibration • Integrated power supply • DVI and DisplayPort interface • LED Backlight

Photo

Displays - Mammo

JVC - CL-S1200

Highlights • Panel technology: IPS • 2,000 : 1 contrast ratio • Auto Text Mode • Dynamic Gamma • Front and ambient light sensor • Remote management and calibration • Integrated power supply • DVI and DisplayPort interface

Photo

PET-CT

Siemens Healthineers - Biograph Vision Quadra*

Highlights • 4 × axial PET field of view • 106 cm axial PET filed of view • 3.2 mm LSO crystals • 100 percent sensor coverage • Fast time of flight at 228 ps** • Highest effective sensitivity of 1,000 cps/kBq*** • Designed to fit in the room size of traditional PET/CT scanners * Biograph Vision Quadra is not commercially…

Photo

Mobile DR

Canon - Mobirex+

Highlights • New ultra-compact design • Power assisted, pressure sensitive steering • Telescopic column • 19 inch multi-Touch supported display • Additional 8 inch tube-head display • Collimator features an LED bulb, laser alignment markers for SID accuracy, and selectable copper filtration • Secondary drive controls on the…

Photo

Conebeam CT

Cefla – NewTom Giano HR Range

FOV: 4 × 4 cm – 16 × 18 cmScan time: 14 sPixel size: 68 μm – 100 μmHighlights• Sharp, detailed 3D images useful for otorhinolaryngology investigations• Dedicated trajectories for studying pathologiesof the cervical spine• Examination of both temporomandibular jointsin a single scan• Pre-set radiation levels and exclusive SafeBeam technology…

Photo

Tau pathology in the brain

Defining the 4 subtypes of Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the abnormal accumulation and spread of the tau protein in the brain. An international study can now show how tau spreads according to four distinct patterns that lead to different symptoms with different prognoses of the affected individuals. The study was published in Nature Medicine.

Photo

Testing Devices

Radcal – Accu-Gold+

 HighlightsThe most versatile dose measure- ment instrument availableAn excellent solution for Radiography, Fluoroscopy, Mammography, CT, and Dental applicationsSupports Radcal’s full line of ion chambers and solid-state dose sensorsComplimentary Accu-Gold software incorporates an easy-to-use interface customizable for your individual needsA streamlined Excel interface allows automated…

Photo

Testing Devices

Radcal – Accu-GoldTouch

Highlights• A comprehensive stand alone diagnostic test instrument• Supports the full range of x-ray modalities incorporating the most extensive sensor selection in the industry• Access to Radcal’s full line of solid-­state, ion chamber, and mA sensors• Includes a large easy-to-read5" touchscreen display• Simple, accurate, and reliable measurement of Dose,…

Photo

Testing Devices

Radcal – Accu-GoldTouch Professional

Highlights• A stand-alone diagnostic x-ray quality assurance instrument• Includes all of the capabilities of the Accu-Gold Touch system• Supports the full range of x-ray modalities incorporating the most extensive sensor selection in the industry• Rechargeable Battery provides hours of continuous use• Embedded memory storage• The Touch Pro includes wired and wireless…

Photo

Testing Devices

IBA Dosimetry – Spot-Luminance meter LXcan

HighlightsFor luminance measurements at image display devices accordingDIN 6868-157, DIN V 6868-57,IEC 61223-2-5 and AAPM TG18.• Distance and contact measurement• Easy targeting with a built-in camera and display• Ultrasound distance sensor for the optimal distanceOptional photometric detector LX-LS to measure the Illuminace in combination with LXcan

Photo

Displays – Color

JVC – MS-S300

Panel size: 21.3" Resolution: 1,536×2,048/1,536×6,144 Max. Luminance: 3,000 cd /m2 Highlights• Panel technology: IPS • 2,000 : 1 contrast ratio • True 11 Bit grayscale • ISD Support • Front and ambient light sensor • Remote management and calibration • Integrated power supply • DVI and…

Photo

Displays – Color

JVC – CL-R211

Panel size: 21.3"Resolution: 1,600 × 1,200Max. Luminance: 500 cd / m2Highlights• Panel technology: IPS• 1,800 : 1 contrast ratio• Front and ambient light sensor• Remote management and calibration• Integrated power supply• DVI and DisplayPort interface• Optional AR coating• Auto Text mode and Dynamic Gamma

Photo

Displays – Color

JVC – CL-S200

Panel size: 21.3"Resolution: 1,600 × 1,200Max. Luminance: 1,000 cd / m2Highlights• Panel technology: IPS• 1,200 : 1 contrast ratio• Front and ambient light sensor• Remote management and calibration• Integrated power supply• DVI and DisplayPort interface• Optional AR coating• Auto Text mode and Dynamic Gamma

Photo

Displays – Mammo

JVC – CL-S500

Panel size: 21.3“Resolution: 2,048 × 2,560 Max. Luminance: 1,150 cd / m2Highlights• Panel technology: IPS • 2,000 : 1 contrast ratio • Auto Text Mode • Dynamic Gamma • Front and ambient light sensor • Remote management and calibration • Integrated power supply • DVI and DisplayPort interface

Photo

PET-MR

Siemens Healthineers – Biograph Vision*

System sensitivity: –Energy resolution (NEMA): –Fields of view: Up to 263 mm (axial)Highlights• Gantry Opening: 78 cm • Volumetric Resolution: 51 mm3 • 3.2 mm LSO crystals • Fast time of flight at 214 ps**  • High effective sensitivity at 100 cps/kBq** • 100% sensor coverage * Biograph Vision is not commercially available in…

Photo

DR

DRgem – Diamond (U-arm Type)

                                       Power: 52 / 68 / 82 kWDetector type: GOS / CsIPixel size: –                                            Highlights• System…

Photo

Injectors

Medtron AG – Accutron CT

Application: CTPressure: 21 barFlowRate: 0.1 – 10 ml / sHighlights• Integrated heated syringe holder with Easy Loading Syringe (ELS) 200 ml • Touchscreen control panel with different languages • Wireless touchscreen remote control • Secured injection position (built-in sensor) • Aluminium housing • Use of prefilled syringes (as an…

Photo

Injectors

Guerbet – FlowSens

Application: CTPressure: 21 barFlowRate: 0.3 – 10 ml/sHighlightsSyringeless CT Contrast Delivery System• Advanced touchscreen interface• Only few seconds between patients• 12H manyFlow(closed pre-connected day set)• Secufill patient line(scientific study on demand)• All available media containers• Check-valves (no backflow)• 4 Air sensors•…

Photo

Injectors

Bracco – EmpowerCTA+

Application: CTPressure: 40 – 325 psiFlowRate: 0.1 – 10.0 ml/s *Highlights• Syringe: 200 ml (CM), 200 ml (NaCl) • Tilt sensor/lockout• Arming at the injector • Independently rot0ating and very compact injector head (270 degrees)• Integrated electroluminescent display • Modular flexibility of components and Windows based software allow…

Photo

1.5 Tesla

Siemens Healthineers – Magnetom Sola with BioMatrix

Gradient: Up to 45 mT / m1Slewrate: Up to 200 T / m / s1Channels: Up to 204 × 64Highlights• First 1.5T BioMatrix system, 70cm open bore, and large 50×50×50cm3 FoV • New BioMatrix sensors for increased consistency – capturing respiratory, cardiac**, and head motion• Expanded BioMatrix tuners for excellent homogeneity – adapting to challenging…

Photo

1.5 Tesla

Siemens Healthineers – Magnetom Sola Cardiovascular Edition

Gradient: 45 mT / m1Slewrate: 200 T / m / s1Channels: 204 × 64Highlights• A dedicated MRI scanner designed to meet the demands of cardiovascular examinations• Free-breathing CMR exams with Compressed Sensing Cardiac Cine for functional imaging even for patients with arrhythmias or those who cannot hold their breath.• Tissue characterization with MyoMaps and HeartFreeze for…

Photo

How to deliver more and better care at lower costs

Moving the needle in MRI productivity

In an industry where every second and every click counts, workflow inefficiencies consume as much as a third of the MRI procedure time. This is a key area of focus where technology advances can ­radically change what is possible with an MRI exam. Given ­declining reimbursements, fewer skilled resources, and the system-­wide burden of chronic diseases, maximizing productivity is a ­strategic…

Photo

Surgical robotics

Elevating outcomes of surgery

What’s in a name? In the case of Asensus Surgical, Inc., previously known as TransEnterix, Inc., the recent rebranding doubles as a mission statement for the manufacturer of surgical robotics systems: The initial ‘A’ stands for artificial intelligence and augmented surgery, reflecting the company’s emphasis on new technologies designed to enhance the operator’s cognition (‘sensus’…

Photo

Interventional Radiology

Endovascular simulator – your coach for complex interventions

With interventional procedures becoming more and more complex the demands on the interventionalists are also increasing. Endovascular simulators allow practical angiography training. In December 2020, the University Hospital Essen, Germany, was the first European facility to install Mentice’s VIST G7+. Professor Dr Jens Theysohn, senior physician at the Institute of Diagnostic and…

Photo

Nano science

Conductive hydrogel could replace brain tissue

Due to their tissue-like mechanical properties, hydrogels are being increasingly used for biomedical applications; a well-known example are soft contact lenses. These gel-like polymers consist of 90 percent water, are elastic and particularly biocompatible. Hydrogels that are also electrically conductive allow additional fields of application, for example in the transmission of electrical signals…

Photo

Self-administration of medication

Many patients use their inhalers and insulin pens wrong. An AI system could fix this

From swallowing pills to injecting insulin, patients frequently administer their own medication. But they don’t always get it right. Improper adherence to doctors’ orders is commonplace, accounting for thousands of deaths and billions of dollars in medical costs annually. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have developed a system to reduce those numbers for some…

Photo

Non-invasive corona breath testing

SpiroNose: The electronic nose that knows about Covid-19

Rapid tests, PCR tests, self-tests… there are many test options to determine contamination with Covid-19. In most this is done by inserting a cotton swab deep into the nose and/or throat to extract some mucus – unpleasant for adults and often a drama for children. Towards the end of 2020, a new system emerged to rule out a Covid-19 contamination. The electronic SpiroNose performs a…

Photo

Shaping daily activities for elderly fragile people

Meet 'Tessa' the little robot helper

‘Hello Tessa. Do you know what I’m doing today?’ a fragile, elderly woman asks tentatively. The small robot she’s addressing has a decorative plant on its head and is wearing a jacket. This is not a funny fantasy. Tessa has proved ‘her’ usefulness and acceptability. The little robot results from a year-long pilot project recently completed in the Netherlands by the Groene Kruis…

Photo

Agfa’s SmartXR

AI gives the digital radiography workflow a boost

In the move to evidence-based medicine, healthcare budgets put more pressure on efficiency, while quality of care has to meet ever increasing standards. Agfa has chosen to direct its development of artificial intelligence (AI) solutions towards helping radiology departments meet these challenges. Agfa’s SmartXR AI upgrades for its digital radiography portfolio focus on supporting operational…

Photo

Evaluation of contact-free interaction model

Talking to a 'robotic doc'? Most patients wouldn't mind

In the era of social distancing, using robots for some health care interactions is a promising way to reduce in-person contact between health care workers and sick patients. However, a key question that needs to be answered is how patients will react to a robot entering the exam room. Researchers from MIT and Brigham and Women’s Hospital recently set out to answer that question. In a study…

Photo

Wearable for blood pressure, heart rate, glucose and more

New patch monitors multiple markers at once

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a soft, stretchy skin patch that can be worn on the neck to continuously track blood pressure and heart rate while measuring the wearer’s levels of glucose as well as lactate, alcohol or caffeine. It is the first wearable device that monitors cardiovascular signals and multiple biochemical levels in the human body at the same…

Photo

Healthcare facilities analysed

Cutting Coronavirus air contamination in hospitals

Preventing air contamination in healthcare facilities is crucial to minimise the airborne spread of Covid-19 and its new strains. Universal masking, rigorous use of and safe disposal of PPE, plus building ventilation are vital. Twenty-four studies reporting hospital SARS-CoV-2 air contamination are summarised in a meta-analysis by a multi-institutional team of French researchers. These show that,…

Photo

Restoring proprioception after amputation

New surgery improves 'phantom limb' sensation, prosthesis control

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have invented a new type of amputation surgery that can help amputees to better control their residual muscles and sense where their “phantom limb” is in space. This restored sense of proprioception should translate to better control of prosthetic limbs, as well as a reduction of limb pain, the researchers say. In most…

Photo

On the go

Improving wearables for medical applications

Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of fatalities in Germany. Medical wearables which measure vital parameters such as the blood pressure, heart rate and blood oxygen levels in real time could help detect these diseases early, and treat them on a preventive basis. In daily life and during sports activities, in the form of fitness bracelets or smart watches, these small, portable…

Photo

Imaging physics

'Quantum holography' could advance medical imaging

A new type of quantum holography which uses entangled photons to overcome the limitations of conventional holographic approaches could lead to improved medical imaging and speed the advance of quantum information science. A team of physicists from the University of Glasgow are the first in the world to find a way to use quantum-entangled photons to encode information in a hologram. The process…

Photo

Protein anchors

Key molecule in cancer spread and epilepsy discovered

Certain anchor proteins inhibit a key metabolic driver that plays an important role in cancer and developmental brain disorders. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and the University of Innsbruck, together with a Europe-wide research network, discovered this molecular mechanism, which could open up new opportunities for personalized therapies for cancer and neuronal diseases.

Photo

Microneedles

No more needles for bloodtests?

Blood draws are no fun. They hurt. Veins can burst, or even roll — like they’re trying to avoid the needle, too. Oftentimes, doctors use blood samples to check for biomarkers of disease: antibodies that signal a viral or bacterial infection, such as SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for COVID-19, or cytokines indicative of inflammation seen in conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and…

Photo

Solutions for Covid-19 challenges

Plug-and-Play between Laptop and Monitor

The Corona pandemic poses new challenges for health care facilities as well as manufacturers of health IT and medical technology. Marcel Herrmann, Marketing Manager Medical Imaging at JVCKenwood, explains in an interview what these are and how they can be solved.

Photo

Risk of miscalculations

Researchers point out flaws in current Covid-19 models

Reports from Imperial College regarding the spread and the effects of Covid-19 had considerable policy impacts in several European countries. But the models that informed the reports have considerable flaws, and are not sufficient to draw the conclusions that were published. This is according to researchers from universities including Linköping University (LiU), in an article in Nature.

Photo

Wearable sensor

Covid sensor ring detects even subtle symptoms

A smart ring that generates continuous temperature data may foreshadow Covid-19, even in cases when infection is not suspected. The device, which may be a better illness indicator than a thermometer, could lead to earlier isolation and testing, curbing the spread of infectious diseases, according to a preliminary study led by UC San Francisco and UC San Diego.

Photo

Eliminating the need for additional monitors

New displays for different diagnostic images

Displaying medical images from different modalities such as CT, CR/DR, MR, ultrasound or mammography and pathology on one monitor - that is what most radiologists want. Many of them still use several medical displays next to each other. JVCKenwood's new CL-S1200 30.9-inch colour monitor makes this a thing of the past. The 12 megapixel device (4,200 horizontal and 2,800 vertical) can display…

Photo

Decreasing infection risk

Researchers develop touch-free vital signs monitor

Scientists at Heriot-Watt University have developed a technique that monitors a patient’s vital signs completely touch free. By using a continuous wave radar-based system to sense tiny chest movements, the new method can accurately measure an individual’s heart rate and respiratory rate without the need for wires, probes, wearable technology or other skin attachments. It could also identify…

Photo

Atrial fibrillation treatment

Gold-tipped, force sensing ablation catheter approved for CE-market

Electrophysiologists in Europe will now have access to state-of-the-art, gold-tipped force sensing ablation catheters following the Biotronik announcement that AlCath Force is CE-market approved. With the release of the unique catheter, a full suite of specialized tools for a complete solution in the treatment of complex atrial fibrillation (AF) cases is available to physicians.

Photo

AI-powered radiography

Agfa launches SmartXR Assistant

Agfa announces the launch of its SmartXR portfolio on 29 November 2020 at RSNA, being held virtually. SmartXR uses a unique combination of hardware and AI-powered software to lighten radiographers’ workloads and provide image acquisition support. This newest member of Agfa’s DR portfolio offers key assistance during the radiology routine, which has proven to be very important during the…

Photo

Early imaging assessment of Covid-19

Robot-assisted tele-ultrasound on 5G

Ultrasound specialists at the Hainan Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army General Hospital in Sanya and the Zhejiang Provincial People’s Hospital of Hangzhou successfully conducted robotic tele-ultrasound examinations over a 5G network of four patients with confirmed and suspected Covid-19. They were in Tongxiang and Wuhan, cities some 2600+ kilometres distant.

Photo

spotlight at virtual.MEDICA

Digital health is on the rise due to COVID-19

MEDICA in Düsseldorf is a world-leading platform for the medical technology business and the healthcare industry and has always been one of the places to be for the entire sector as it covers current digital health trends, innovative products and services for linking all of the major stakeholders in medical care. Consequently, digital health is a mainstay of virtual.MEDICA, which, due to the…

Photo

Blood Gases, Electrolytes, Oximetry

Siemens Healthineers – RapidLab 1200 Blood Gas System

Assays: pH, pCO2, pO2, Na+, K+, Ca++, Cl-, Glu, Lac, Neonatal Total Bilirubin, CO-oximetryDimensions: 230 × 240 × 610 mm (w × h × d)Weight: 2.5 kgHighlights:Siemens RapidLab 1200 Blood Gas System is uniquely designed to meet high-volume critical-care testing needs. The system has an ultra-fast sample processing and microsample capability, with results in 60 seconds.…

Photo

Clinical Chemistry

Sentinel – Sentifit 270 Analyzer (Sysmex)

Sample throughput: Up to 270 samples / hDimensions: 625 × 870 × 670mm (h×w×d)Weight: 120 kgAssays: Faecal Immunochemical Testing (FIT) and Faecal Calprotectin (fCAL)Highlights:The Sentifit 270 is a fully automatic system dedicated to faecal testingContinuous sample loadingAutomatically detects appropriate buffer level in tubeIntegrated sensor prevents blocking of the…

Photo

Rapid diagnostics

The clinical potential of POCT

In 2019, the Central Laboratory of the Institute for Clinical Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry at the Klinikum rechts der Isar of the Technical University Munich, headed by Professor Peter B Luppa, organised the 4th of the internationally renowned Munich Point-of-Care Testing Symposiums. Dr Andreas Bietenbeck is senior physician at the Institute which for many years has been focusing on…

Photo

Uncommon, but reversible

Sudden deaf: permanent hearing loss linked to COVID-19

Although uncommon, sudden permanent hearing loss seems to be linked to COVID-19 infection in some people, warn doctors, reporting the first UK case in the journal BMJ Case Reports. Awareness of this possible side effect is important, because a prompt course of steroid treatment can reverse this disabling condition, they emphasise. Sudden hearing loss is frequently seen by ear, nose and throat…

Photo

Cutting-edge

Taiwan companies present latest equipment advances

The healthcare system of Taiwan, renowned for its ability to tackle challenges, has held up very well during the COVID-19 pandemic. To underline the nation’s role as a healthcare innovator, the Taiwan External Trade Development Council (TAITRA) presented several of the most promising companies and their products in an exclusive webinar. The event showcased cutting-edge technologies as well as…

Photo

Memory formation

Unlocking the mysteries of the brain

A Canadian research team highlights the mechanisms underlying memory and learning capacity – specifically, how our brains process, store and integrate information. How does our brain store information? Seeking an answer, researchers at CHU Sainte-Justine Hospital and Université de Montréal have made a major discovery in understanding the mechanisms underlying learning and memory formation.…

Photo

Multiple sensors to capture high-res images

A new detector for long-length digital radiography

Carestream Health has introduced a new digital radiography detector in the United States and Canada, enabling hospitals and imaging centers that specialize in long-length imaging to increase productivity while decreasing both patient discomfort and dose. With a single exposure, the Carestream DRX-L Detector captures long-length images by providing a large field of view and high resolution for…

Photo

Wearable watcher

Personalised treatment through smartwatch medication tracking

Engineers in the US have demonstrated that drug levels inside the body can be tracked in real time using a custom smartwatch that analyzes the chemicals found in sweat. This wearable technology could be incorporated into a more personalized approach to medicine — where an ideal drug and dosages can be tailored to an individual. The engineers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)…

Photo

Smart breathing support

Self-learning ventilators could save more COVID-19 patients

As the corona pandemic continues, mechanical ventilators are vital for the survival of COVID-19 patients who cannot breathe on their own. One of the major challenges is tracking and controlling the pressure of the ventilators, to ensure patients get exactly the amount of air they need. Researchers at the Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) have developed a technique based on self-learning…

Photo

Cell invasion

Filopodia: The long 'fingers' of highly invasive lung cancer

Tiny finger-like projections called filopodia drive invasive behavior in a rare subset of lung cancer cells, researchers at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University have found. Adam Marcus’ lab has developed innovative techniques for separating “leaders” and “followers,” subpopulations of tumor cells that cooperate during the process of metastasis. The lab’s new analysis of what…

Photo

Blocking coronavirus entry portals

Cell ‘membrane on a chip’ could speed up COVID-19 drug screening

Researchers have developed a human cell ‘membrane on a chip’ that allows continuous monitoring of how drugs and infectious agents interact with our cells, and may soon be used to test potential drug candidates for COVID-19. The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, Cornell University and Stanford University, say their device could mimic any cell type - bacterial, human or even the…

Photo

Wearables and apps in cardiology

Digital health: guardian angel or 'Big Brother'?

Cardiologist Professor Martin Cowie raised an important issue on the challenges of the digitisation of cardiovascular healthcare at the ESC Congress 2019 in Paris. In his presentation, he confirmed that, within digital health transformation, the role of physician and the patient-doctor relationship will continue. However, much of the preparation may be conducted remotely.

Photo

Disinfection

Robots help fight hospital infections

In the hustle and bustle of a hospital, properly disinfecting all surfaces in a patient room can be a challenging and time-consuming task. Now, in times of the coronavirus pandemic, it can also be life-threatening. To minimize the risk for their staff, hospitals are utilizing disinfection robots to sanitize surfaces and rooms. Read on and learn more about how some of those robots are used to…

Photo

Organic lungs, synthetic muscles

Biohybrid model re-creates respiration mechanics

Benchtop tools for studying the respiratory system misrepresent the interdependence between the diaphragm, abdomen and lungs. Meanwhile, computational models often hide the mechanisms in a black box computation, without a clear picture of what transpires in the process. This means students form a poor understanding of respiratory mechanisms and makes it hard to train clinicians for real scenarios…

Photo

COVID-19 detection

New analyzer detects virus antibodies in 20 minutes

Researchers at Hokkaido University have succeeded in detecting anti-avian influenza virus antibody in blood serum within 20 minutes, using a portable analyzer they have developed to conduct rapid on-site bio tests. If a suitable reagent is developed, this technology could be used to detect antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, the causative virus of COVID-19.

Photo

Biomimetic sight assistance

"Artificial eye" prototype shows great promise

Researchers at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), the University of California, Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory are developing an artificial eye with capabilities close to its human model. The research team published their work on the biomimetic eye in the journal Nature. “Watching sci-fi series such as Star Trek and I, Robot, I thought about making a…

Photo

Coronavirus imaging

AI enhanced lung ultrasound for COVID-19 testing

Establishing whether a patient is suffering from severe lung disease, possibly COVID-19, within a few minutes: this is possible using fairly simple ultrasound machines that are enhanced with artificial intelligence. A research team at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) and the University of Trento in Italy has been able to translate the expertise of top lung specialists into a software…

Photo

Molecular electronics

Biosensor chips for infection surveillance and more

Roswell Biotechnologies, Inc., a manufacturer of molecular electronics sensor chips, and imec, a research and innovation hub in nanoelectronics and digital technologies, announced a partnership to develop the first commercially available molecular electronics biosensor chips. These chips are the brains behind Roswell Technologies' new platform for DNA sequencing, to support precision medicine,…

Photo

Physical contact research

Two people, one MRI: The science of cuddling

Researchers at Aalto University and Turku PET Centre have developed a new method for simultaneous imaging brain activity from two people, allowing them to study social interaction. In a recent study, the researchers scanned brain activity from 10 couples. Each couple spent 45 minutes inside the MRI scanner in physical contact with each other. The objective of the study was to examine how social…

Photo

Wearable against diabetic retinopathy

Smart contact lenses for diabetes diagnosis and treatment

Diabetes is called an incurable disease because once it develops, it does not disappear regardless of treatment in modern medicine. Having diabetes means a life-long obligation of insulin shots and monitoring of blood glucose levels. Recently, a research team at Pohang University of Science and Technology developed a wirelessly driven ‘smart contact lens’ technology that can detect diabetes…

Photo

Seeking an ideal lab life

New and old challenges in laboratory medicine

The Central Laboratory at the Medical University Hanover, Germany, is prepared to handle virtually any clinical chemistry task, from a routine test to the most complex analysis. Equipped with state-of-the-art technology and thanks to a high degree of automation, the team can process more than 3,000 specimens, mostly blood and urine, in a single day. Professor Ralf Lichtinghagen, European…

Photo

COVID incidence at airports and in hospitals

Biosensor to detect coronavirus in crowded places

A team of researchers from Empa, ETH Zurich and Zurich University Hospital has succeeded in developing a novel sensor for detecting the new coronavirus. In future it could be used to measure the concentration of the virus in the environment - for example in places where there are many people or in hospital ventilation systems. Jing Wang and his team at Empa and ETH Zurich usually work on…

Photo

Ultrasound monitoring

'Smart bra' to detect early-stage breast cancer

Students from EPFL in Switzerland teamed up with startup IcosaMed to develop the SmartBra – the first piece of smart clothing that can be used for cancer prevention. “Our smart-clothing technology is designed to detect cancer at the earliest stages. It uses a non-invasive, painless method based on frequent ultrasound monitoring,” says Hugo Vuillet, one of the students on the development…

Photo

New sensor tech

A more reliable way to early detect lung tumours

People who are at high risk of developing lung cancer, such as heavy smokers, are routinely screened with computed tomography (CT), which can detect tumors in the lungs. However, this test has an extremely high rate of false positives, as it also picks up benign nodules in the lungs. Researchers at the Massachussetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have now developed a new approach to early…

Photo

Monitoring Covid-19 from the sky

A ‘pandemic drone’ to detect coronavirus infections

A ‘pandemic drone’ to remotely monitor and detect people with infectious respiratory conditions is being developed by the University of South Australia (UniSA) in partnership with a Canadian company. The drone will be fitted with a specialised sensor and computer vision system that can monitor temperature, heart and respiratory rates, as well as detect people sneezing and coughing in crowds,…

Photo

Acetone sensors

3D printing sensors for diabetes breath tests

The production of highly sensitive sensors is a complex process: it requires many different steps and the almost dust-free environment of special cleanrooms. A research team from Materials Science at Kiel University (CAU) and from Biomedical Engineering at the Technical University of Moldova has now developed a procedure to produce extremely sensitive and energy-efficient sensors using 3D…

Photo

Flu forecast

Portable AI device predicts outbreaks based on coughing

University of Massachusetts Amherst researchers have invented a portable surveillance device powered by machine learning – called FluSense – which can detect coughing and crowd size in real time, then analyze the data to directly monitor flu-like illnesses and influenza trends. The FluSense creators say the new edge-computing platform, envisioned for use in hospitals, healthcare waiting rooms…

Photo

Ultrasound

SIUI – CTS-800

Transducer inputs: 1Display mode: 2DDisplay size: 7"Highlights• Handheld ultrasound scanner for farm animals• 7" WVGA LCD monitor• Environmental rating: IP54 (main unit) and IP67 (probe head)• Three hours operating time• Software and report for reproductive system• Gravity sensor for layout change (transverse / vertical)• Measurement for distance,…

Photo

Displays – Grayscale

JVC – MS25i2

Panel size: 21.3“Resolution: 1,600 × 1,200 / 4,800 × 1,200Max. Luminance: 1,900 cd / m2Highlights• Panel Technology: IPS • 1,400 : 1 contrast ratio • True 11 Bit grayscale • ISD Support • Front and ambient light sensor • Remote management and calibration • Integrated power supply • DVI and DisplayPort…

Photo

Displays – Color

JVC – CL-S300

Panel size: 21.3" Resolution: 2,048×1,536 Max. Luminance: 1,000 cd /m2 Highlights• Panel technology: IPS • 1,500 : 1 contrast ratio • Front and ambient light sensor • Remote management and calibration • Integrated power supply • DVI and DisplayPort interface • Optional AR coating • Auto Text mode and…

Photo

Displays – Mammo

JVC – MS-S500

Panel size: 21.3“Resolution: 2,048 × 2,560 / 2,048 × 7,680Max. Luminance: 3,000 cd / m2Highlights• LED Backlight • 2,000 : 1 contrast ratio • True 11 Bit grayscale • ISD Support • Front and ambient light sensor • Remote management and calibration • Integrated power supply • DVI and DisplayPort interface

Photo

Cancer radiotherapy monitoring

Novel hydrogel turns pink to indicate radiation dose sweet spot

More than half of all cancer patients undergo radiation therapy and the dose is critical. Too much and the surrounding tissue gets damaged, too little and the cancer cells survive. Subhadeep Dutta and Karthik Pushpavanam, graduate students working in the lab of Kaushal Rege, Professor at Arizona State University in Tempe, and collaborators at Banner-M.D. Anderson in Gilbert, Arizona, developed a…

Photo

Research award shortlist

Soft cardio-robot and 'Google Maps' of the heart face Big Beat Challenge

The British Heart Foundation (BHF) announced its shortlist of four research projects competing for a single £30 million award. The charity says it is one of many radical new approaches needed to address a frightening mismatch in research funding compared with the burden of heart and circulatory diseases. With the World Health Organization forecasting an increase in cardiovascular deaths…

Photo

Look out!

Eye movement test confirms brain-ageing effects

University of Liverpool researchers have used a newly developed eye movement test to improve the understanding of how parts of the brain work. Healthy, older adults are widely reported to experience cognitive decline, including impairments in inhibitory control (the ability to stop ourselves thinking or doing things). However, because ageing effects on inhibitory control are highly variable…

Photo

NVIDIA at RSNA

Federated learning brings AI with privacy to hospitals

With over 100 exhibitors at the annual Radiological Society of North America conference using NVIDIA technology to bring AI to radiology, 2019 looks to be a tipping point for AI in healthcare. Despite AI’s great potential, a key challenge remains: gaining access to the huge volumes of data required to train AI models while protecting patient privacy.

Photo

Innovative design

Maximum power for efficient processes

Vacuum systems are the best solution for the safe disposal of biological liquids in laboratories. A coated membrane, special valves and a high gas tightness offer the safe and sustainable disposal of biological liquid waste. The latest generation of Axonlab's universal mini vacuum extraction system was developed in a development period of around 18 months. The patented product combines years of…

Photo

KUKA Innovation Award

Five Healthy Living finalists selected

Augsburg, Bavaria – Five teams of robotics specialists are finalists in the KUKA Innovation Award 2019 competition. Established in 2014, the Award focuses on medical robotics for the first time, Dr Rainer Bischoff, Vice President Corporate Research at KUKA, one of the judges of the award, explained. Around thirty talented robotics teams from all over the world submitted their concepts and an…

Photo

Trailblazers in medical solutions

Taiwanese excellence on display at Medica

From Augmented Reality to Robotics, and all exciting technologies in between, the Taiwanese companies present at Medica always manage to impress visitors with health tech innovations. In co-operation with the Bureau of Foreign Trade (BOFT) of the Taiwanese Ministry of Economics and the Taiwan External Trade Development Council (TAITRA), 20 elite healthcare companies put on display their…

Photo

Brain signals control a four-limb robotic system

Tetraplegic moves towards taking walks

Thanks to a four-limb robotic system controlled by brain signals, a patient with a cervical spinal cord injury could walk and control both arms for the first time in a proof of concept. Developed by CEA (French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission), the system is driven via the long-term implant of a semi-invasive medical device to record brain activity.

Photo

Raising the bar

A new ultra-compact microscopy camera

The MKC-X800 ultra-compact camera is a new addition to Ikegami’s range of medical imaging equipment, which, the firm reports, sets higher than ever standards of imaging quality to capture the precise colour and image detail of surgical operations. Measuring just 28x28x52mm WHD and weighing 100g, it can be mounted on a surgical microscope, lightweight support stand or boom. With its 4K-native…

Photo

The benefits of making hospitals smart

The IoT mesh network

Refining hospital processes saves costs, improves workflows and patient care plus outcomes. To realise those aims, a hospital in the Netherlands has installed an Internet of Things (IoT) mesh network. A pilot project initiated by a Dutch children’s hospital has enlisted an entire ward as an Internet of Things (IoT) playground, to experiment with various type of tags, sensors and switches in a…

Photo

A country encouraging intelligent medical innovations

Taiwan innovators shine at Medica

Health tech Made in Taiwan is among the mainstays of every MEDICA; this year’s fair is no exception. In co-operation with the Bureau of Foreign Trade (BOFT) of the Taiwanese Ministry of Economics and the Taiwan External Trade Development Council (TAITRA), 20 world-class healthcare companies are demonstrating innovative medical solutions based on national advances in Artificial Intelligence…

Photo

Smart patch

ELSAH: A wearable to determine biomarkers

The EU four-year project ELSAH, which began at the dawn of 2019, aims to design a wearable to enable continuous determination of biomarker concentrations. Project coordinator Dr Joerg Schotter, Molecular Diagnostics, Centre for Health & Bioresources, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, explains the project’s objectives and potential applications for the planned wearable.

Photo

Non-invasive testing

Laser sensor to analyse blood without needles

A photonics tech company from Vilnius are on their path to solve the 50-year-old task of making non-invasive blood analysis possible. With the help of a unique broadband laser-based sensor, the scientists and engineers at Brolis Sensor Technology are able to remotely sense concentration level of main critical blood constituents such as lactate, glucose, urea, ketones or ethanol without drawing…

Photo

MRSA & Co.

Test to detect antibiotic resistance in less than 45 minutes

Scientists from Scotland are developing a low cost, rapid diagnostic sensor test which aims to show the susceptibility of bacteria to antibiotics within 45 minutes. Laboratory testing of samples can take up to two days and the new test aims to allow doctors to be able to prescribe the correct antibiotic to a patient for an infection more quickly. In a research paper published in the journal…

Photo

Crucial contact

Artificial skin makes nursing robots sensitive

Sensitive synthetic skin enables robots to sense their own bodies and surroundings – a crucial capability if they are to be in close contact with people. Inspired by human skin, a team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed a system combining artificial skin with control algorithms and used it to create the first autonomous humanoid robot with full-body artificial skin. This…

Photo

UK tests high-speed remote medical diagnosis

Ultrasound scanning via a 5G network

To demonstrate advances in 5G connectivity for healthcare, a UK team has linked a paramedic in a simulated ambulance to a hospital-based clinician. The paramedic wore a robotic or ‘haptic’ glove, which received signals over the live 5G network. Using a joystick, the clinician remotely directed the paramedic to move the ultrasound sensor to where on the patient the clinician wanted to scan.…

Photo

When painkillers won't help

A new approach to pancreas pain treatment

One of the worst symptoms associated with inflammation or cancer of the pancreas is severe chronic pain. Pancreatic pain is difficult to treat, because many painkillers prove ineffective in pancreatic patients. In a recent study, a team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) discovered the cause of this phenomenon for the first time: a particular neuroenzyme in the body is present in the…

Photo

Better image quality with fewer sensors

Machine learning improves biomedical imaging

Scientists at ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich have used machine learning methods to improve optoacoustic imaging. This relatively young medical imaging technique can be used for applications such as visualizing blood vessels, studying brain activity, characterizing skin lesions and diagnosing breast cancer. However, quality of the rendered images is very dependent on the number and…

Photo

New ideas

MEDICA becomes number one trade fair for health start-ups

Healthcare is going digital worldwide at an incredibly rapid pace. More and more applications for prevention, diagnostics and therapy are being made into apps (with matching hardware) for smartphones and tablets or are even available as wearables for direct use on the body. Digitalisation is also striding forward in Germany, where doctors, therapists and patients still take a fairly analogue…

Photo

Onvision needle tip tracking

A breakthrough in real-time ultrasound guidance for regional anesthesia

Royal Philips and B. Braun Melsungen AG announced the launch of Onvision, a breakthrough ultrasound guidance solution for real-time needle tip tracking in regional anesthesia. Available on the latest version of the B. Braun and Philips Xperius ultrasound system, Onvision gives anesthesiologists the confidence to accurately position the needle tip inside the body. The introduction is part of a…

Photo

Tools: tracing, tracking, relocating

A truly smart children’s hospital

In a busy hospital, thousands of devices and equipment are on the move every hour of every day. Beds, blood pressure monitors, wheelchairs, or infusion pumps can be taken to different locations and, at times, even ‘lost’. Keeping track of vital tools is a challenge, particularly given the massive throughput of patients and staff shift changes. However, innovative tracking systems are evolving…

Photo

In the skin

New 'pain organ' discovered

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered a new sensory receptor organ that is able to detect painful mechanical damage, such as pricks and impacts. The discovery is being published in the scientific journal Science. Pain causes suffering and results in substantial costs for society. Almost one person in every five experiences constant pain and there is a considerable need to…

Photo

Improved motion range

Brace yourselves: Robotic neck support for ALS patients

A novel neck brace, which supports the neck during its natural motion, was designed by Columbia engineers. This is the first device shown to dramatically assist patients suffering from Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) in holding their heads and actively supporting them during range of motion. This advance would result in improved quality of life for patients, not only in improving eye contact…

Photo

Tissue model

How clots become firm in the presence of blood flow

Blood clotting is one of the most critical, protective processes in human physiology. When something goes wrong with clotting, either because there is too much clotting, leading to a stroke, or not enough, leading to internal bleeding, the outcome can be catastrophic. Now, University at Buffalo researchers have established an in vitro model of this process that will help clinicians improve…

Photo

Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

The lab-on-a-chip SERS platform

Analytically sensitive and specific detection of pharmaceuticals or metabolites in bodily fluids, as well as fast and reliable detection of human pathogens, are major challenges for instrument-based analytics in medical diagnostics. Over the past few years the combination of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and microfluidic devices (Lab-on-a-Chip) has emerged as a perfectly suited…

Photo

Human-Computer Interaction

Shaping the laboratories of the future

The need to effectively address HCI – Human-Computer Interaction – is emerging as the key challenge in creating a productive and efficient laboratory of the future. The subject was examined in detail by Andreas Schuller from the Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Engineering in Stuttgart, Germany, during the recent SLASEurope2019 conference in Barcelona, which brought together more than…

Photo

Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry

Hydration sensor could improve dialysis

For patients with kidney failure who need dialysis, removing fluid at the correct rate and stopping at the right time is critical. This typically requires guessing how much water to remove and carefully monitoring the patient for sudden drops in blood pressure. Currently there is no reliable, easy way to measure hydration levels in these patients, who number around half a million in the United…

Photo

Drug delivery, microsurgery

Microbots show promise in tumor treatment

Targeting medical treatment to an ailing body part is a practice as old as medicine itself. A Band-Aid is placed on a skinned knee. Drops go into itchy eyes. A broken arm goes into a cast. But often what ails us is inside the body and is not so easy to reach. In such cases, a treatment like surgery or chemotherapy might be called for. A pair of researchers in Caltech's Division of Engineering and…

Photo

Innovation award IERA

This robot destroys hospital bugs

The 15th Innovation and Entrepreneurship Award in Robotics and Automation (IERA) goes to the “UVD Robot” by Blue Ocean Robotics. The collaborative robot autonomously drives around hospitals while emitting concentrated UV-C light to eliminate bacteria and other harmful microorganisms. As a result, hospitals can guarantee a 99.99% disinfection rate – reducing the risk for patients, staff and…

Photo

Avoiding incidents

The digital early warning system

Staff shortages are among the most urgent healthcare problems. While digitisation might offer relief, unfortunately many hospitals lag behind in transforming their processes. As pressure mounts, the chorus is heard: ‘It’s high time for bold changes’. Indeed, this was the motto of the 2019 Western German Health Congress held in Cologne, an event that focuses on health policy and health…

Photo

Flow cytometry

Living cells – the essential biomarker

The team of the Heinz Nixdorf Chair of Biomedical Electronics at the Technical University of Munich focuses on innovative diagnostic tools to accelerate the development towards personalized medicine. Therapies tailored to the individual patient – this is the future not only of oncology but of many medical disciplines. “At this point, however,” concedes Professor Dr Oliver Hayden,…

Photo

MCG motion capture

The world’s first precision motion analysis and digital care company

A team of seasoned European healthcare entrepreneurs announced the foundation of MCG motion capture GmbH (MCG), the world’s first precision motion analysis and digital care company. The team combines decades of expertise in the medtech, digital health and biopharmaceutical industry, including big data integration, analysis for decision support, and long-standing experience in clinical trials as…

Photo

Be prepared

This 3D printed baby dummy could improve resuscitation training

Two millions: this is, worldwide, the number of babies which suffer suffocation during birth every year. A resuscitation procedure is sometimes the key to avert irreparable damages for the baby. And, for successful outcomes, promptness of action and preparation are vital. Researcher Mark Thielen (Industrial Design) from the Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) developed a 3D printed baby…

Photo

Health Innovation Night

Digitization: New therapy approaches for the patient 'hospital'

Digitalization offers great potential for hospitals: diseases can be detected earlier, internal processes more efficiently organized, health expenditure reduced and patients better cared for. Artificial intelligence, robotics, sensor technology, big data, additive manufacturing or augmented reality - the technologies for this have long been available.

Photo

Neurodegeneration

Study sheds new light on microglia

Inside the body, disease and injury can leave behind quite the mess — a scattering of cellular debris, like bits of broken glass, rubber and steel left behind in a car accident. Inside the central nervous system (CNS), a region that includes the brain and spinal cord, it is the job of certain cells, called microglia, to clean up that cellular debris. Microglia have counterparts called…

Photo

Cancer research

Black nanoparticles slow tumor growth

Melanin protects our skin from the sun’s damaging rays by absorbing light energy and converting it to heat. This could make it a very effective tool in tumor diagnosis and treatment, as demonstrated by a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Helmholtz Zentrum München. The scientists managed to create melanin-loaded cell membrane derived nanoparticles, which improved tumor…

Photo

Twisted by design

Stretchable electronics to move wearables forward

Stretchable electronics is emerging as a promising new technology for next-generation wearable devices, according to a review published in Science and Technology of Advanced Materials. The technology has many possible applications for healthcare, energy and the military. But there are several challenges involved in finding suitable materials and manufacturing methods. The biggest challenge for…

Photo

PET/MRI, PET/RF & more

Disruptive innovations in molecular imaging

Molecular imaging is an exciting field for scientists who are willing to explore and innovate, prominent Spanish physicist José María Benlloch pointed out when he reviewed some of the most impacting and recent innovations in his portfolio during a meeting in Valencia. ‘Our mission is to develop innovative sensitive and harmless medical imaging instruments for early detection of diseases and…

Photo

Biosensor

New rapid test for sepsis could save thousands of lives

Researchers at the University of Strathclyde have developed an innovative, low cost test for earlier diagnosis of sepsis which could save thousands of lives. The simple system for sensitive real-time measurement of the life threatening condition is much quicker than existing hospital tests, which can take up to 72 hours to process. Using a microelectrode, a biosensor device is used to detect if…

Photo

Cingulum stimulation

Laughter may be best medicine for brain surgery

Neuroscientists at Emory University School of Medicine have discovered a focal pathway in the brain that when electrically stimulated causes immediate laughter, followed by a sense of calm and happiness, even during awake brain surgery. The effects of stimulation were observed in an epilepsy patient undergoing diagnostic monitoring for seizure diagnosis. These effects were then harnessed to help…

Photo

Power to the pacemaker

Harvesting the heart's energy to power life-saving devices

The heart's motion is so powerful that it can recharge devices that save our lives, according to new research from Dartmouth College. Using a dime-sized invention developed by engineers at the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth, the kinetic energy of the heart can be converted into electricity to power a wide-range of implantable devices, according to the study funded by the National…

Photo

Arthroplasty

"Smart" knee implant could be the future of joint replacements

Smart knee implants may soon be a reality thanks to research conducted by a team including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. Knee replacement surgery is the most common joint replacement procedure, with the number of surgeries increasing every year. Many of those surgeries are done to replace an older implant or one that has worn out. Increasingly, this surgery is…

Photo

Advancing radiology

Giving MRI a boost – and a brain

In his talk at the Garmisch Symposium­, entitled “MRI in 5 minutes – Dream or Reality?” Dr. Daniel Sodickson of the New York University School of Medicine will give attendees a preview of the MR scanners of the future, which he likens to self-­driving cars. Sodickson — a professor and vice chair for research in the department of radiology at NYU, a principal investigator at the Center…

Photo

Blockage detection

This blood flow sensor wraps around the blood vessel

A new device developed by Stanford University researchers could make it easier for doctors to monitor the success of blood vessel surgery. The sensor, detailed in a paper published in Nature Biomedical Engineering, monitors the flow of blood through an artery. It is biodegradable, battery-free and wireless, so it is compact and doesn’t need to be removed and it can warn a patient’s doctor if…

Photo

Innovation

Taiwan at Medica 2018: virtual solutions for real problems

Jhy-Wey Shieh sees the link between Taiwan and Germany as obvious: ‘The word “trade” – of central importance for Medica – starts with “t” for Taiwan and contains “de” for Germany – there is no better way to put it.’ Even though the Taiwanese ambassador’s linguistic journey was not to be taken too seriously, this year’s presentation from the Taiwan External Trade…

Photo

On the go

Wearable ultrasound patch penetrates the skin to measure blood pressure

Researchers funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) are literally breaking barriers using ultrasound waves emitted from a flexible patch to accurately measure central blood pressure and help detect cardiovascular problems earlier. For a while now, smart, wearable devices have had the ability to capture how many steps we take in a day or measure our heart…

Photo

Photonic endoscopy

Fibre probe explores the depth of our brain

This could be a major step towards a better understanding of the functions of deeply hidden brain compartments, such as the formation of memories, as well as related dysfunctions, including Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers from the Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology (Leibniz IPHT) in Jena and the University of Edinburgh have succeeded in using a hair-thin fibre endoscope to gain insights…

Photo

Digital PET imaging

Digital Photon Counting improves diagnostic accuracy

Built as the first commercially available scanner to deliver truly digital PET, the Vereos PET/CT, from Philips, offers revolutionary Digital Photon Counting technology. The science behind this scanner evolution is ‘quite complicated’, agrees Piotr Maniawski, Director of Clinical Science Nuclear Medicine at Philips Healthcare, yet the improved performance is significant, particularly when…

Photo

Innovation

AI helpers simplify clinical MRI scans

The new 1.5 Tesla MRI from Siemens Healthineers, Magnetom Sola, is packed with helpful algorithms and other functions. AI-supported systems monitor patients and scan parameters and ensure consistent image quality. Whilst visitors at this year’s ECR-Expo admired the new device, Prof. Ulrike Attenberger has already tested it in practice.

Photo

Neuro-research

Brain-computer interfaces: Getting a Grasp on how we think

A world where machines can be controlled by thought alone – such is the promise of so-called brain-computer interfaces (BCI). BCIs are both hardware and software communication systems that read brain and nerve signals, convert those into electrical signals and translate human thoughts into machine commands. Developers of BCIs rely on artificial intelligence, neural network models and big data…

Photo

Cut device-related pressure ulcers

Biomedical designers must increase safety

Whilst acknowledging that state-of-the-art bioengineering approaches are being applied in preventing Medical Device Related Pressure Ulcers (MDRPUs), Professor Amit Gefen, from the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Tel Aviv University, believes there are gaps in knowledge and technology in this area and therefore more must be done to improve patient care and avoid additional healthcare…

Photo

Blood pressure

How does the baroreceptor reflex work?

The baroreceptor reflex is a fascinating medical phenomenon. The reflex is controlled by specialized neurons that react in just a fraction of a second to keep blood pressure fairly consistent. For example, when you stand up, your blood pressure normally drops—rapidly. Yet you don't faint thanks to baroreceptors, which tell your heart rate to increase and push more blood to your brain. A new…

Photo

Smartphone detection

Spectrometry? There's an app for that!

Checking a lump for malignancy, finding out if food is fresh, just with your smartphone? It’s possible, according to Eindhoven University of Technology researchers in the Netherlands. Their recently presented spectrometer is small enough to insert into a smartphone. This device is not yet ready for use on a big scale, Professor Andrea Fiore, supervisor of the Eindhoven research team points out.…

Photo

A link to the past

Tomorrow's hospitals – inspired by 15th century architechture

In the hustle and bustle of the Salone del Mobile – Milan’s famous design week – an oasis of peace and calm comes as a surprise. The Cortile dei Bagni is such a surprise; this inner bath courtyard is part of a Milan hospital built in the 15th century. Here, architect Filippo Taidelli installed a contemplative space experience that tells a story about the future of healthcare. Its title…

Photo

Interventional radiology in oncology

Augmented reality sees right through the patient

A new augmented reality system to guide procedures in interventional oncology is currently taking its first steps. A three-step experiment proves this system to be precise and reliable enough to facilitate image guidance critical to the success of interventional oncology procedures. Using a back-face camera and a tablet PC to visualise the patient, the system projects 3D images of body structures…

Photo

Gait analysis

What your walk says about your health

The way you walk can reveal current and future health problems. New research from Halmstad University suggests the use of wearable sensors for analysing your movement. This can potentially result in early detection of for example Parkinson’s disease, dementia, multiple sclerosis and other neuro-physiological disorders. Many of our body systems, such as the cardio-vascular system and the…

Photo

Photoacoustics

New method shows 3D images of cancer cells in the body

Making tumour cells glow: Medical physicists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have developed a new method that can generate detailed three-dimensional images of the body's interior. This can be used to more closely investigate the development of cancer cells in the body. The research group presents its findings in "Communication Physics".

Photo

Against the noise

Minimizing hearing loss triggered by loud noises

It’s well known that exposure to extremely loud noises — whether it’s an explosion, a firecracker or even a concert — can lead to permanent hearing loss. But knowing how to treat noise-induced hearing loss, which affects about 15 percent of Americans, has largely remained a mystery. That may eventually change, thanks to new research from the Keck School of Medicine of USC, which sheds…

Photo

Wisdom tooth indeed

This electronic high-tech tooth could predict diseases

An interdisciplinary team of researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the School of Engineering & Applied Science is redefining the notion of a wisdom tooth. The team is developing a smart-tooth technology that could someday be used to detect early signs of certain diseases in high-risk patients by analyzing saliva or gingival crevicular fluid.…

Photo

Macular degeneration

Deteriorating eyesight is part of getting older? Don't be so sure

Many people accept deteriorating eyesight as an inevitable part of getting older, but blurry or distorted vision – such as when straight lines appear wavy – could be signs of age-related macular degeneration. The condition is the most common cause of severe vision loss in people age 50 and older in developed countries.

Photo

Dynamic spine brace

First robotic spine exoskeleton to help treat deformities

Spine deformities, such as idiopathic scoliosis and kyphosis (also known as “hunchback”), are characterized by an abnormal curvature in the spine. The children with these spinal deformities are typically advised to wear a brace that fits around the torso and hips to correct the abnormal curve. Bracing has been shown to prevent progression of the abnormal curve and avoid surgery. The…

Photo

Joint disease

Nanotechnology detects molecular biomarker for osteoarthritis

For the first time, scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have been able to measure a specific molecule indicative of osteoarthritis and a number of other inflammatory diseases using a newly developed technology. This preclinical study used a solid-state nanopore sensor as a tool for the analysis of hyaluronic acid (HA). HA is a naturally occurring molecule that is involved in tissue…

Photo

DNA analysis

Magnetic biosensor array simplifies cancer detection

In standard settings, the analysis of each DNA modification requires a carefully optimised assay that runs under specific conditions. This increases cost and labour and is a severe limitation to throughput. Now, however, researchers at Stanford University and the Technical University of Denmark have come up with a new method that will enable doctors to make a more precise diagnosis, prognosis and…

Photo

New technologies

Robots in medicine: Weak knees and hard facts

Although robotics is now an established arm of medical technology – with the Da Vinci surgical system a trailblazer – many basic issues need to be resolved before nurse Robot can report for the morning shift in a ward. Since centre-forward Robot and nurse Robot are closely related, we spoke with the developer of soccer robots about current progress.

Photo

Advances in manufacturing

Easy printing of biosensors made of graphene

Cell-based biosensors can simulate the effect of various substances, such as drugs, on the human body in the laboratory. Depending on the measuring principle, though, producing them can be expensive. As a result, they are often not used. Cost factors for sensors that perform measurements electrically are the expensive electrode material and complex production. Fraunhofer scientists are now…

Photo

New monitor generation

The i3 series improves diagnosis

JVC reports a complete redesign of its display line-up, bringing the i3 series to market. ‘At first glance, the new housing design stands out; the displays bezels are much narrower than in the previous generation,’ JVC points out. ‘Also new are function buttons on the screen with virtual descriptions. These customisable buttons give users direct access to various functions.’

Photo

An era of turbulence and innovation

The birth and rebirth of imaging

The New Horizons Lecture at the RSNA annual meeting is a keynote address that looks to the future, and the inventor of a major innovation in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology, Daniel K Sodickson MD PhD, did just that. His lecture entitled ‘A New Light: The Birth and Rebirth of Imaging’ looked back at how MRI has evolved and forward at what it will become.

Photo

Innovation

New monitor generation for better diagnosis

JVC has completely redesigned its display line-up, bringing the i3 series to market. At first glance, the new housing design stands out; the displays bezels are much narrower than in the previous generation. Also new are function buttons on the screen with virtual descriptions. These customizable buttons give users direct access to various functions. But not only visually, the devices have been…

Photo

Practico

Merivaara introduces versatile operating table

Merivaara has unveiled one of the world’s most versatile operating tables for elective procedures. The new, smarter Practico was designed to improve ergonomics with the industry’s widest range of posture possibilities. “Customers have been asking for a table like this for years,” says Jyrki Nieminen, Merivaara’s R&D director. “It has been in development for two years and we have…

Photo

Pressure monitoring

This biodegradable sensor disappears after its job is done

Engineers at the University of Connecticut (UConn) have created a biodegradable pressure sensor that could help doctors monitor chronic lung disease, swelling of the brain, and other medical conditions before dissolving harmlessly in a patient’s body. The UConn research is featured in the current online issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The small, flexible sensor is…

Photo

Consumer Electronic Show

Blockchain, Blue Button and interoperability among hot topics at CES 2018

The tech world descended upon Las Vegas this week for the annual Consumer Electronics Show, and plenty of health IT’s biggest players were in attendance. While much of the discussion was on consumer-friendly health tools and novel digital interventions, there were still a handful of products and discussions between executives and entrepreneurs focused on healthcare’s largest roadblocks —…

Photo

Nano-scale diagnostics

Researchers are developing a ‘Lab-on-skin’ to monitor biomarkers

Move over, lab-on-a-chip and lab-on-paper. There’s a new diagnostic technology in research labs that is gaining credibility. It is called lab-on-skin technology and some scientists are quite excited about how it might be used for a variety of clinical purposes. A recent story published in ACS Nano titled, “Lab-on-Skin: A Review of Flexible and Stretchable Electronics for Wearable Health…

Photo

TAITRA presentation

Taipei hits highs in Medica 2017

3-D visualisation, augmented reality, automated tumour classification – today, the Republic of China produces cutting-edge medical technology and it’s a long time since ‘Made in Taiwan’ stood for inferior, copied products. Over recent years, this island state has successfully morphed into a productive and, above all, innovative manufacturer of medical technology available on the world…

Photo

The Force is strong

How an amputee controls prosthetic fingers like Luke Skywalker

Luke Skywalker’s bionic hand is a step closer to reality for amputees in this galaxy. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have created an ultrasonic sensor that allows amputees to control each of their prosthetic fingers individually. It provides fine motor hand gestures that aren’t possible with current commercially available devices. The first amputee to use it, a musician…

Photo

Digital and real world combine

World premiere for mixed reality surgery

The Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP) has organized, in partnership with TeraRecon, Vizua, Microsoft and Digital Evolutis, the live broadcast of the first surgery performed in the world with a collaborative platform of mixed reality at the Avicenne Hospital AP-HP, and interacting with remote doctors. Dr. Gregory Thomas, Head of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology Hospital Avicenne…

Photo

Replicas

Researchers 3D print lifelike artificial organ models

A team of researchers led by the University of Minnesota has 3D printed lifelike artificial organ models that mimic the exact anatomical structure, mechanical properties, and look and feel of real organs. These patient-specific organ models, which include integrated soft sensors, can be used for practice surgeries to improve surgical outcomes in thousands of patients worldwide. “We are…

Photo

Innovative technology

3-D-printed prosthetic implants could improve hearing loss treatment

Researchers using CT scans and 3-D printing have created accurate, custom-designed prosthetic replacements for damaged parts of the middle ear, according to a study being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). The technique has the potential to improve a surgical procedure that often fails because of incorrectly sized prosthetic implants, researchers…

Photo

Cooperation

GE and NVIDIA join forces to accelerate AI adoption in healthcare

GE Healthcare and NVIDIA announced they will deepen their 10-year partnership to bring the most sophisticated artificial intelligence (AI) to GE Healthcare’s 500,000 imaging devices globally and accelerate the speed at which healthcare data can be processed. The scope of the partnership, detailed at the 103rd annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), includes the…

Photo

More than just a system crash

What are the limits of AI in clinical decision support systems?

Every day we hear news about Artificial Intelligence (AI) impacting more and more aspects of our lives. Stories about autonomous vehicles would probably top a current list of AI news. With all the excitement coming with these promising AI technologies, we are also starting to understand the limitations. In a recent Las Vegas traffic accident involving an autonomous bus and a truck, the cited…

Photo

Sensor technology

Breathing air systems

How can newborn babies benefit from sensors with chip technology and what might the future hold for sensor data? Samuel Wehrli, Product Manager for Gas Flow at Sensirion AG in Switzerland explained during our EH interview at the MST Conference held in Dortmund.

Photo

BeneVision Patient Monitoring Solution

Envisioning the future of patient monitoring

30 years ago, monitoring in most intensive care environments was via an ECG display with a numeric value for heart rate combined with intermittent manual measurements of blood pressure. Advances in technology have greatly increased monitoring parameters. Eight, for example, are included in the current minimum standards for monitoring under anaesthesia but more than ten further sensors are…

Photo

Non-invasive sensors

Manometry v. BioBeat

A preliminary human study was conducted to validate an advanced wearable sensor which has been developed by the start-up company BioBeat Technologies Ltd, comparing it to the common manometry method. The 2015 guidelines of the European Society of Hypertension on The requirements of the International Protocol (revision 2010) were used to define the difference between the commonly used device and…

Photo

A bed suitable for wash tunnels

The gentle patient lifter

Among products demonstrated at Medica 2017 will be those from Dewert-Okin GmbH, which manufactures and sells single and double drives, lifting columns, control keypads and control units, products that are used for bedding, seating, medical and office application. The firm’s MEGAMAT 12 extra-quiet single drive for hospitals and nursing beds features wash-tunnel resistance on request. ‘With the…

Photo

Neurotransmissions

Nanosensors uncloak the mysteries of brain chemistry

Nanosensors are incredible information-gathering tools for myriad applications, including molecular targets such as the brain. Neurotransmitter molecules govern brain function through chemistry found deep within the brain, so University of California, Berkeley researchers are developing nanosensors to gain a better understanding of exactly how this all plays out. During the AVS 64th…

Photo

Ultrasound

Controversies and practices in breast cancer screening

A controversy regarding the benefit of early screening programmes for breast cancer continues. Germany, Austria and Switzerland have developed individual strategies. European Hospital asked three experts from these countries to outline each chosen system. Markus Hahn MD, senior consultant at the University Breast Centre in Tübingen, Martin Daniaux, MD, Head of Breast Diagnostics at the Breast…

Photo

Prenatal care

Fever itself in early pregnancy might cause birth defects

Duke researchers now have evidence to suggest the fever itself, not its root source, could interfere with the development of the heart and jaw during the first three to eight weeks of pregnancy. Researchers have known for decades that fevers in the first trimester of pregnancy increase risk for some heart defects and facial deformities such as cleft lip or palate. Exactly how this happens is…

Photo

Predicting cognitive decline

Odor identification problems may be a warning bell for dementia

A long-term study of nearly 3,000 adults, aged 57 to 85, found that those who could not identify at least four out of five common odors were more than twice as likely as those with a normal sense of smell to develop dementia within five years. Although 78 percent of those tested were normal – correctly identifying at least four out of five scents – about 14 percent could name just three out…

Photo

Perception research

Why do we see colors the way we do?

Dr. Wolf M. Harmening from University Eye Hospital Bonn, together with American colleagues, studied color vision by probing individual sensory cells – photoreceptors – in the human eye. The results reveal that proximity effects play a key role in how we perceive colors.

Photo

Breath Biopsy platform

Owlstone Medical CEO Billy Boyle wins Royal Academy of Engineering’s Silver Medal

Billy Boyle, Founder and CEO of Owlstone Medical, a diagnostics company developing a breathalyzer for disease, is to be awarded the Royal Academy of Engineering’s prestigious Silver Medal. The award recognizes engineer Billy’s work in spearheading the development of the company’s Breath Biopsy platform and driving a vision to save 100,000 lives and $1.5 billion in healthcare costs.

Photo

Clinical testing

Total laboratory automation with Tosoh and DiaSys

Tosoh and DiaSys announce a collaboration for clinical laboratory testing with the combination of Tosoh’s new generation analyzers (AIA-CL1200 for immunoassay and G11 for HbA1c) and DiaSys’ BioMajesty JCA-BM6010 / C. Instruments are linked through Evoline and Evoline Manager, Tosoh’s open laboratory automation and middleware solution. The collaboration addresses current requirements…

Photo

Blood flow control

"Switch" in brain’s capillary network monitors activity

All it takes is the flip of a protein “switch” within the tiny wire-like capillaries of the brain to increase the blood flow that ensures optimal brain function. New research has uncovered that capillaries have the capacity to both sense brain activity and generate an electrical vasodilatory signal to evoke blood flow and direct nutrients to nourish hard-working neurons.

Photo

Monitoring

Down to earth devices

Space missions are famous for driving innovation, from Mylar blankets to microchips. So when French scientists learned one of their compatriots would be aboard the Soyuz MS-03 spacecraft to reach the International Space Station (ISS), they gathered cutting edge technologies for him to carry into orbit.

Photo

Cardiology

Simpler MR-conditional cardiac device selection

The ProMRI Configurator made by Biotronik is an online tool that enables physicians to select from a series of MRI requirements for a patient and subsequently generates a recommendation of all suitable MR-conditional cardiac device and lead combinations available in a particular country, thus helping physicians to choose the most suitable MR-conditional cardiac systems for each patient.

Photo

Sarcoidosis

Penn Medicine Launches First Apple ResearchKit App for Sarcoidosis Patients

Penn Medicine today launched its first Apple ResearchKit app, focused on patients with sarcoidosis, an inflammatory condition that can affect the lungs, skin, eyes, heart, brain, and other organs. The effort marks Penn’s first time using modules from Apple’s ResearchKit framework, as part of the institution’s focus on mobile health and innovative research strategies.

PSP test

Most rapid sepsis point of care diagnostics

Abionic SA announced the receipt of CE Mark (Conformité Européenne) for two novel tests using its easy to use testing platform, abioSCOPE. The CE Mark allows Abionic to commercialize its tests for sepsis risk assessment and management (PSP Test) and iron deficiency throughout the European Union.

breath samples

You are what you exhale

An international team of 56 researchers in five countries has confirmed a hypothesis first proposed by the ancient Greeks – that different diseases are characterized by different “chemical signatures” identifiable in breath samples. The findings by the team led by Professor Hossam Haick of the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology Department of Chemical Engineering and Russell Berrie…

Photo

Artificial beta cells

New weapon against Diabetes

ETH Researchers have used the simplest approach yet to produce artificial beta cells from human kidney cells. Like their natural model, the artificial cells act as both sugar sensors and insulin producers.

Photo

Embedded computing

Sensing and communicating our ups/downs and many needs

The power of computing grows more pervasive as it is increasingly integrated into everyday items within our immediate environment, as in smart toothbrushes, for example, or a vortex whistle for managing chronic lung function via smartphones. This September, scientists, developers and designers from around the world met in Heidelberg, Germany, for two parallel events: ACM International Joint…

Photo

Automation

Faster liquid handling system development for OEM applications

Tecan is making it quicker and easier than ever before for manufacturers to develop instruments for advanced liquid handling applications. The launch of the new Cavro Omni Flex further extends the flexibility and convenience of the company’s popular Cavro Omni Robot by offering more hardware options to complement its precision pipetting, including frames, worktables, power and input/output…

Photo

Spanish hospital checks vital signs remotely

Not having to visit hospital daily, or stay there too long, can improve the lives of patients tremendously. The Vic Hospital Consortium, in Catalonia, Spain, has begun to use a new remote monitoring system that enables it to monitor patients wherever they are. European Hospital spoke with Enrique de la Vega, digital product manager at Catalonia’s technology centre Eurecat, the organisation…

Photo

low radiation

High resolution detectors to create safer X-ray diagnosis

A European health consortium is developing a set of low radiation, low cost, flat panel X-ray detectors that use novel photonics technology to make diagnosis safer for patients, hospital and dental staff, generating some of the highest resolution images ever seen in rapid moving body functions, such as malicious growths or the beating heart of a baby.

Photo

Altering the ‘flavor’ of humans could help fight Malaria

A new study by Johns Hopkins researchers suggests that a specialized area of the mosquito brain mixes tastes with smells to create unique and preferred flavors. The findings advance the possibility, they say, of identifying a substance that makes “human flavor” repulsive to the malaria-bearing species of the mosquitoes, so instead of feasting on us, they keep the disease to themselves,…

Photo

Patient care

Advancing AF and renal dysfunction care

An innovative cardiac monitoring system that delivers continuous resynchronisation to patients, has shown a 35% risk reduction of hospitalisation for heart failure (HF) patients. The finding comes from the RESPOND-CRT (cardiac resynchronisation therapy) clinical trial, which was designed to investigate the clinical efficacy and safety of device-based optimisation using the SonR cardiac…

Photo

Neurosurgery

Their parts are simply too big

‘An autonomously working robot in the operating theatre will continue to be a vision of the future for a long time to come,’ according to Professor Uwe Spetzger, Clinical Director and Neurosurgery Specialist at Karlsruhe City Hospital. At the same time, he is calling for political support for the development and promotion of these innovative technologies and asking funding bodies to rethink…

Photo

STAR

Robot outperforms standard surgery techniques

Intelligent robots supervised by surgeons could help remove human error from the operating room. Dr. Peter C. Kim, Vice President and Associate Surgeon-in-Chief at Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation at Children's National Health System (CNSH) in Washington, D.C., and his colleagues designed and programmed “Smart Tissue Autonomous Robot”, or simply STAR, to successfully…

Photo

Map

How the brain is organized

The age of exploration has long passed, but there is at least one area still largely uncharted: the human brain. Now, a detailed new map by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis lays out the landscape of the cerebral cortex – the outermost layer of the brain and the dominant structure involved in sensory perception and attention, as well as distinctly human…

Photo

MRI AutoDetect

BIOTRONIK Wins Cardiostim Innovation Award

BIOTRONIK has won the Cardiostim Innovation Award in the category “Best Practice Improvement” for its MRI AutoDetect feature. The company’s Ilivia implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) and cardiac resynchronization device (CRT-Ds) are the world’s first equipped with a sensor capable of automatically recognizing a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment.

Photo

RadiNET Pro

EIZO Monitor Quality Control Solutions

A monitor’s display of color and brightness changes over time with use. Having a monitor that lasts long and is capable of maintaining quality control with regular adjustments is important. RadiForce monitors are equipped with various features and functions for stabilizing and adjusting monitor brightness to meet standard viewing requirements. They also have built-in sensors for easily…

Photo

Epilepsy

Minisensor is designed to warn of epileptic seizures

For epilepsy patients and attending physicians, it has been a challenge to correctly assess the frequency and severity of epileptic seizures without inpatient recording equipment. A consortium coordinated by the epileptologists of the University Hospital Bonn is now developing a mobile sensor that can detect seizures. A warning signal is designed to summon relatives or attending physicians to…

Photo

Mimicking touch

Amputee feels texture with a bionic fingertip

An amputee was able to feel smoothness and roughness in real-time with an artificial fingertip that was surgically connected to nerves in his upper arm. Moreover, the nerves of non-amputees can also be stimulated to feel roughness, without the need of surgery, meaning that prosthetic touch for amputees can now be developed and safely tested on intact individuals.

Photo

Discovery

Blueprint of body's heat sensor

Touch a hot stove, and your fingers will recoil in pain because your skin carries tiny temperature sensors that detect heat and send a message to your brain saying, "Ouch! That's hot! Let go!" The pain is real and it serves a purpose, otherwise we'd suffer greater injury. But for many people with chronic pain, that signal keeps getting sent for months or years, even when there is no…

Photo

Wound management

Laser-assisted wound closure for oral and maxillofacial surgery

Partners from Germany, Israel, Latvia and Italy will systematically advance the use of biophotonic technologies for industrial, clinical and medical applications in the Biophotonic Technologies for Tissue Repair (BI-TRE) project. As part of the transnational BiophotonicsPlus initiative, the German consortium commenced its activities on September 1, 2015. The goal is to supply oral and…

Photo

Muscle signals

Robotic glove restores hand movements

Patients who have lost their hand functions due to injuries or nerve-related conditions, such as stroke and muscular dystrophy, now have a chance of restoring their hand movements by using a new lightweight and smart rehabilitation device called EsoGlove developed by a research team from the National University of Singapore (NUS).

Photo

Cancer cells poised for growth when opportunity knocks

Researchers have identified a mechanism that allows cancer cells to respond and grow rapidly when levels of sugar in the blood rise. This may help to explain why people who develop conditions in which they have chronically high sugar levels in their blood, such as obesity, also have an increased risk of developing certain types of cancer.

Photo

Neurodegenerative diseases

The case of the sticky protein

Proteins are like a body’s in-house Lego set. These large, complex molecules are made up of building blocks called amino acids. Most of the time, proteins fold correctly, but sometimes they can misfold. This misfolding causes the proteins to get sticky, and that can promote clumping, or aggregation, which is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as ALS, Alzheimer’s and…

Photo

Imaging

84-inch 8MP displays strengthen consultations

More is better – when it comes to medical display technology a higher resolution is a desirable feature of next generation displays. Today, the number of pixels alone is just one of many factors that distinguishes a display developed specifically for diagnostic purpose from those designed for regular use. Shinji Nohara, Product Manager for Pro/Colour/Medical Desktop Display at NEC Display…

Photo

Hands-free technology

Xbox gaming technology may improve X-Ray precision

With the aim of producing high-quality X-rays with minimal radiation exposure, particularly in children, researchers have developed a new approach to imaging patients. Surprisingly, the new technology isn’t a high-tech, high-dollar piece of machinery. Rather, it’s based on the Xbox gaming system.

Photo

Non-invasive

Good news for diabetics, cardiology patients and caretakers

At this year’s MEDICA, CNOGA Medical Ltd. will be introducing its new line of non-invasive, pain-free patient vital signs monitoring TensorTip™ devices, and presenting its new Singular™ platform, a secure cloud-based ecosystem infrastructure platform as well as its new mobile application for sending results to physicians, friends and caretakers. CNOGA’s easy-to-use, portable devices are…

Photo

Evolution

On the cusp of Medicine 4.0

In the world of technology, the term Industry 4.0 is already well known. Univ-Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Bernhard Wolf has reveals a comparable development in medicine. Smart systems and personalisation have enormous potential, the Professor for Medical Electronics at the Technical University of Munich is convinced.

Photo

Obstetrics

New atlas will redefine OB/GYN imaging

Using the Arietta V70 from Hitachi, a French diagnostic imaging team is rewriting the book on obstetrics and gynaecology. Entitled the ‘Atlas d’échographie de fusion en gynécologie obstétrique’, the new edition by Jean-Marc Levaillant MD, and colleagues from the diagnostic imaging centres at the Bicêtre and Créteil hospitals in Paris, will be published before the end of 2015.

Photo

MEDICA 2015

JADAK to introduce chart recorder and thermal printer

JADAK will launch the XE-80P, a portable, battery-powered thermal printer and chart recorder, at Medica, in Düsseldorf, Germany, Nov. 16-19, in Hall 13, Suite Room 8. The XE-80P’s unique Charge-on-Demand™ feature allows the user to choose when the printer will charge, which reserves all power for the host device’s functions during a critical event. The XE-80P is the first printer JADAK…

Photo

MEDICA 2015

Power and impact of visual solutions

This year at MEDICA, Sony Healthcare Solutions builds on its position in the market as a leading provider of medical imaging technologies. Sony will demonstrate the power and impact visual solutions have in the world of medicine, from pre-operative diagnosis and the latest 4K surgical imaging through 4K over IP distribution up to education, post-surgical review and long archive storage.

Photo

Prosthesis

Just like a healthy foot

‘It’s like a new lease on life,’ says Wolfgang R, ‘I can feel the difference between grass and concrete again.’ Eight years ago the Austrian teacher‘s lower leg had to be amputated following thrombosis. Today, he is the first leg amputee, worldwide, to sport a sensory-enhanced prosthesis. ‘For the wearer the prosthesis is not a numb object, but a part of the body,’ says Dr Hubert…

Photo

Fast and easy

Schiller's diagnostics station DS20...

... simplifies your daily work: Most vital signs and physical assessment tools united in one device; large, interactive touch screen and intuitive guidance. With 12-lead ECG interpretation, spirometry and Pulse Wave Analysis (PWA), DS20 is a practical and yet sophisticated diagnostic station.

Photo

Scientist designs bio-inspired robotic finger

Most robotic parts used today are rigid, have a limited range of motion and don’t really look lifelike. Inspired by both nature and biology, a scientist from Florida Atlantic University has designed a novel robotic finger that looks and feels like the real thing. In an article recently published in the journal Bioinspiration & Biomimetics, Erik Engeberg, Ph.D., assistant professor in the…

Photo

Development

Dynamic braces for kids with scoliosis

Some six million people in the U.S. suffer from scoliosis, a sideways curvature of the spine. These include approximately 2 to 3% of adolescents who are diagnosed each year with idiopathic scoliosis, which is usually identified during puberty and progresses until skeletal maturity. One in 500 children today require treatment using spine braces and 1 in 5,000 need spinal surgery. The typical spine…

Photo

The mechanism that impairs blood flow with aging

With the world’s elderly population expected to double by 2050, understanding how aging affects the body is an important focus for researchers globally. Cardiovascular disease, the No. 1 cause of death worldwide, often is associated with aging arteries that restrict blood flow. Now, University of Missouri researchers have identified an age-related cause of arterial dysfunction, a finding that…

Photo

Diagnostic station DS20

Modern and practical design unites the most demanded functions

Schiller's Diagnostic Station DS20 simplifies the daily work: most vital signs and physical assessment tools united in one device; large, interactive touch screen; intuitive guidance and ease of use. Launch of the Diagnostic Station DS20 is going to take place at the ESC in London (29th August – 2nd September 2015).

Photo

Real-time data for cancer therapy

In the battle against cancer, which kills nearly 8 million people worldwide each year, doctors have in their arsenal many powerful weapons, including various forms of chemotherapy and radiation. What they lack, however, is good reconnaissance — a reliable way to obtain real-time data about how well a particular therapy is working for any given patient.

Photo

Therapy

Molecular imaging mines deeper

The view across the Atlantic – it fills Professor Fabian Kiessling, Chair of Experimental Molecular Imaging at the RWTH Aachen (Rhine-Westphalia Institute of Technology Aachen), with optimism. The USA offers more opportunities for molecular imaging. Only recently, new tracers for Alzheimer’s were accepted as reimbursable in some centres, whilst the development of new diagnostics in Europe…

Photo

A chip placed under the skin for more precise medicine

Several EPFL laboratories are working on devices allowing constant analysis over as long a period as possible. The latest development is the biosensor chip, created by researchers in the Integrated Systems Laboratory working together with the Radio Frequency Integrated Circuit Group. Sandro Carrara is unveiling it today at the International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS) in Lisbon.

Photo

High-tech textiles – more than just clothes

High-tech textiles must fulfill a number of functions and meet many requirements. That is why the Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC dedicated some major developing work to this most intriguing research area. The result can now be seen at Techtextil trade show in Frankfurt from 4 to 7 May. On display will be novel textile-integrated sensors, a unique multifunctional coating system for…

Photo

Robotic Care

Ambient Assisted Living Systems on the rise

New technologies in healthcare and geriatric care promise great benefits. A Congress held by the Evangelical Academy in Berlin, Germany at the end of February provided a platform for discussions around the potential as well as the risks of new technological developments and trends. Furthermore, the event also saw the introduction of an instrument which can be used to check the ethical dimensions…

Photo

Medical devices

Pacemakers with Internet connection

The ageing of society needs new, more cost-effective solutions to improve the life quality of patients and cut the burden that is placed on the social welfare system. In modern western societies the fitting of pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) is growing rapidly.

Photo

Health Apps

Can medical apps replace conventional medical diagnostics?

The question as to whether or not there is a point in using medical apps on private smartphones is being asked more frequently. Issues around medical diagnostics are among the key points here. We asked Prof. Dr. Dr. Norbert Gässler, Head of the Centre for Laboratory Diagnostics at the St. Bernward Hospital, Hildesheim, for competent advice. Interview: Walter Depner

Photo

Optical imaging

Faster than light

PET scanners are not the only way to image radiotracers. Recent work developed around a phenomenon called Cerenkov luminescence aims to bring a new modality out of preclinical development and into clinical practice.

Photo

Research on injectable oriented hydrogels for spinal cord repair

The research objective of Dr.-Ing. Laura De Laporte, junior group leader at DWI – Leibniz Institute for Interactive Materials in Aachen, is to develop a minimally invasive therapy for spinal cord injury. Her goal and her scientific approach to develop an injectable material with the ability to provide biochemical and physical guidance for regenerating nerves across the injury site, was selected…

Photo

Critical care

European launch of in-line blood gas analyser

Sphere Medical, launches its in-line patient dedicated arterial blood gas analyser in Germany, Netherlands and Belgium at ISICEM 2015. The advanced Proxima System delivers true point-of-care testing (POCT) by enabling critical care staff to obtain frequent laboratory accurate blood gas measurements without leaving the patient’s bedside. This facilitates effective and timely clinical decisions…

Photo

Molecular Imaging

Xe-MRI advances body exploration

Clinical routine would be inconceivable without MR Imaging. Without exposure to radiation, doctors can make a patient’s organs and tissue structures clearly visible. However, pathological changes in the early stages, degenerated cells or small areas of inflammation, have so far remained almost invisible on these images. In 2014, for the first time, a team of cell biologists, chemists and…

Photo

Testing Colours

Dome - Displays benefit from auto-calibration

The standard Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) enables the integration of scanners, servers, workstations, printers and network hardware from multiple manufacturers into a picture archiving and communication system (PACS). It can also sort out when, where and how to calibrate a display. DICOM recommends regular calibration, in the centre of the display with a 10% target and…

Photo

Mobility

Faster First Aid for Catastrophe Victims

A new system aims to speed up the triage of victims during mass casualty incidents: Instead of colored paper tags, first responders use colored electronic wristbands. These serve to locate victims and transmit vital data to emergency response control centers. FIT also demonstrates an app for Android smartphones that lets victims buried alive under a collapsed building contact rescue teams even…

Photo

Technology

Wearable sensors

Wrist-watches, wrist and arm bands, tags, finger rings, clips, smart glasses, shoes, insoles, smart patches (as thermometers), sensors woven into fabrics for T-shirts and socks and, of course, implantable devices as well as ingested pills were displayed by 23 exhibitors in the Wearable Technologies Show at Medica this year. Report: Cornelia Wels-Maug

Photo

Digital Radiography

Fast Forward to DR

Agfa HealthCare accelerates the shift to digital x-ray by enabling any radiology clinic to convert at its own speed and budget with innovative and market-leading solutions.

Photo

Infection Control

POCT accelerates diagnosis of STDs

Trichomonias, with an estimated 187 million cases, and Chlamydia with around 100 million, are the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), according to the World Health Organisation (WHO). There are approximately 36 million cases each of gonorrhoea and syphilis. HIV1/2 cases are around 34 million. Report: Cynthia Keen

Photo

A new tool for biochemical analyses

Although telemedicine could improve the quality of life of patients with chronic liver diseases, viable home care systems are still lacking. However, within the EU-project ‘d-LIVER’ (www.d-liver.eu) scientists at the Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering IBMT, in St. Ingbert, Germany, are working with European partners to develop an IT- and cell-based system that will help chronic…

Photo

Clinical chemistry

THE AACC FORUM 2014

This April, in San Jose, California, the portable lab took central stage at the American Association for Clinical Chemistry’s (AACC) annual forum for emerging clinical diagnostic technologies – a most appropriate topic for the Silicon Valley venue where so many world-changing computer and communications innovations have been born.

Photo

Dual energy brings more to meet the eye

How does spectral – or dual energy – imaging work? Very similar to red and green light used in black-and-white photography. A black-and-white camera provides information on the colours of the photographed objects: an object that is black under red light is actually green.

Photo

Smart Fusion of modalities enhances clinical output

Adding high quality, dynamic ultrasound for hybrid imaging enables clinicians to improve detection of a range of lesions or to intervene better for improved clinical outcomes. ‘We can no longer be fascinated with pictures; what we need is proof of the clinical benefit from tools and techniques,’ said Professor Jose Zamorano MD, Director of Cardiology at Ramón y Cajal University Hospital in…

Photo

Healthcare delivery on the move

The recent Swiss eHealth Summit, a Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) event supported by key organisations, drew 600 leaders from hospitals, policymaking and the industry. Among the key topics: how IT enables access to information in a mobile environment, referred to by speaker Uwe Buddrus as mHealth.

Photo

Complementary mamma diagnostics

Much, if not even everything, may have been said already about the multimodal approach in breast diagnostics. However, Professor Rüdiger Schulz-Wendtland at the Institute of Radiology, University Hospital Erlangen, says there is still surprising news from this field – innovations in multimodal breast diagnostics, for example.

Photo

Electrical sensors detect MRSA

Scientists in Scotland have developed a new test using a strip with electrical sensors that can show whether wounds or lesions have been infected with bacteria, including MRSA, Mark Nicholls reports. The hand-held test provides rapid results and allows almost immediate detection of bacteria, which means patients can be given more effective drugs much quicker and speed up their recovery.

Photo

Cooperation for better detection and treatment of medical conditions

The Johns Hopkins University (JHU), America’s first research university, in Baltimore, Md., USA, and the Fraunhofer Heinrich Hertz Institute (HHI), a mobile and information technology development leader based in Berlin, Germany, have signed a Memorandum of Understanding to jointly research the innovative medical applications of integrated optical sensors: small, highly sensitive devices with…

Photo

A cool way to illuminate procedures

The ACEM Medical Company’s OT - System, which includes the OT-STARLED 7 and STARLED 5, is based on advanced LED (light emitting diode) technology which, the Italian manufacturer reports, ‘…guarantees the best work conditions for surgeons and medical teams in the operating rooms.’

Photo

IT helps ensure patient safety in the ICU – and beyond

Integrated information management reduces risks and cuts cost, Finn Snyder reports. Intensive care units (ICUs) are vital in healthcare. ICUs in US hospitals, for example, treat six million of the sickest and oldest patients annually, according to a document recently published for the Massachusetts Technology Park Corporation, which states that choices about how to manage them carry high stakes:

Photo

Robotic walking aids for paraplegics

In the animal kingdom exoskeletons provide stability and protection for many creatures, such as crustaceans and insects. They are also an inspiration for scientists working at the interface of bionics and medical technology to develop fascinating orthopaedic aids, Anja Behringer reports

Integrated 3-D Imaging Facilitates Human Face Transplantation

By combining conventional medical imaging with some of the same 3-D modeling techniques used in Hollywood blockbusters, researchers are offering new hope to victims of serious facial injuries. Results of a new study on human face transplantation, led by Darren M. Smith, M.D., plastic surgery resident at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), were presented today at the annual meeting…

Photo

The Wearable Technologies Show

We may be able to live longer due to medical advances, but what of the ability to live independently in old age? According to DeStatis, the German Federal Statistical Office, by 2050 there will be a deficit of 260,000 caregivers – and Germany is not alone in this.

Photo

OrthoMIT

More than 30 clinicians, researchers and industry partners (including Siemens, Aesculap and SurgiTAIX, an RWTH spin-off) are working on OrthoMIT, Germany’s largest collaborative orthopaedic research project that aims to develop future strategies for knees, hip and spinal surgery. Anja Behringer reports

Photo

Trends in cardiac pacing

‘Sacrilegious meddling with divine providence’ was the charge brought against New York cardiologist Alfred Hyman in the 1930s when, after successful animal experiments, he applied the first cardiac pacemaker – then still a cumbersome external device – in human patients. A quarter of a century later the first cardiac pacemaker, mounted in a shoe polish tin and covered by epoxy resin, was…

Photo

SWEET news: A paediatric diabetes network

For three years the SWEET project, funded by the EU and the International Society for Paediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD), has been preparing the establishment of centres of reference (CORs) for childhood diabetes. Now, the first 12 European CORs that are certified by SWEET have joined forces to promote improved cross-border cooperation in the treatment of young Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics.

Artificial pancreas

Two small randomised trials published on bmj.com suggest that closed loop insulin delivery (also referred to as an artificial pancreas) may improve overnight blood glucose control and reduce the risk of nocturnal hypoglycaemia in adults with type 1 diabetes.

Photo

EASD 2010 review

7,000 people from 120 countries met in Stockholm this September to hear international experts discuss the progress, solutions and challenges of one of our greatest healthcare burdens. Prevention, self-monitoring, surgery, guidelines, economic problems, drug-safety, and co-morbidities – these are just a few of the problems associated with the care of about 55 million diabetics in Europe.

The MIRACLE begins

Detection of circulating and disseminated tumour cells in blood is a promising method to diagnose cancer dissemination, or to follow up cancer patients during therapy. Today’s methods and involve time-consuming (more than a day) sample processing and cell isolation steps -- all labour intensive and expensive. A lab-on-chip that could integrate those processing steps would enable faster,…

Photo

Cheap and fast cancer diagnosis

t the Engineering in Medicine and Biology Conference (EMBC) in Buenos Aires (Argentina), imec and its project partners announce the launch of the European Seventh Framework Project MIRACLE. The MIRACLE project aims at developing an operational lab-on-chip for the isolation and detection of circulating and disseminated tumor cells (CTCs and DTCs) in blood. The new lab-on-chip is an essential step…

Photo

Heart in hand

Surgeon Alain Carpentier is ready to remove a patient’s heart and replace it with a mechanical device he spent 15 years developing. By 2013 the procedure will be performed on 50 European patients as part of a clinical trial to win CE approval for the world’s first fully implantable artificial heart.

Photo

When is our hand not our hand?

When we look at our hands, how do we know they are part of our body? This seems like a strange question because it is something most of us take for granted. Exciting new data from a research group at the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden show that the brain uses a combination of sensory signals from our eyes and limbs to achieve a sense of ‘body ownership’.

Patient monitoring devices

In 2009, the continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) market earned manufacturers $23.5; this is forecast to reach $52.0 million in 2016, according to a new analysis from Frost and Sullivan (F&S). For the study the markets covered by region are Benelux, Germany, France, Italy, Scandinavia, Spain and the United Kingdom.

Photo

Neurological diseases on the rise

„Diseases of the nervous system and the brain occur more frequently than cancer. According to recent calculations of health care costs, they represent a burden of 386 billion euros a year on European economies,“ says Prof. Gérard Said, newly elected president of the European Neurological Society (ENS) at the annual meeting in Berlin, Germany. „This is often greatly underestimated.“

Photo

Computers make prosthetic legs fit better

The fit of a prosthetic leg is a vital element in determining how well an amputee will function and adapt to the device. Historically, this has been a time-consuming art performed by skilled prosthetists. Today, computers have added science to the mix.

Photo

Peripheral nerve surgery

Neurosurgery has seen enormous progress, which should benefit as many patients as possible. However, according to Prof. Hanno Millesi MD, director of the Millesi Centre for Surgery of Peripheral Nerves, Wiener PrivatKlinik (WPK), a private hospital in Vienna, Austria, ‘methods are perceived incorrectly, because they are often confused with problematic predecessors, and sensible methods are…

Photo

3-D endoscopy for image guided surgery

Segmental liver resections and ablative therapies require accurate and precise tumour localization. Because the peritoneal cavity is subject to deformations caused by respiration and topological changes in the surgical site during an intervention, the transfer of MRT and CT tumour data into an intra-operative setting remains a technical challenge.

Photo

Monitoring CHF patients

Close monitoring of vital signs such as ECG, BP and body weight are vital for many patients suffering cardiovascular disease. MyHeart, an integrated project involving 10 EU Member States, aims to produce better devices and better parameters than currently available, i.e. traditional sensor systems with digital upgrades. The ongoing clinical study has involved six European academic centres and 200…

Photo

New Digital Camera for Fluorescence Applications

The detection and documentation of low light fluorescence signals in live cell experiments is a particular challenge for digital cameras. To meet this demand, Leica Microsystems adds the new Leica DFC345 FX to its portfolio of powerful digital cameras. In addition to combining high sensitivity with high resolution, this new camera features a fast image capture rate and a broad dynamic range,…

Molecular imaging of cancer

Molecular-genetic imaging in living organisms has experienced exceptional growth over the past 10 years, and can be defined as „the macroscopic visualization of cellular processes in space and time at the molecular level of function”.

Biochips to aid in cancer diagnosis

It is very difficult to predict whether a cancer drug will help an individual patient: only around one third of drugs will work directly in a given patient. Researchers at the Heinz Nixdorf Chair for Medical Electronics at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM) have developed a new test process for cancer drugs. With the help of microchips, they can establish in the laboratory whether a…

Photo

Enjoying childhood - despite being a type 1 diabetic

Type 1 diabetes is a life-long autoimmune disease with onset in early childhood. The diagnosis will initially turn the everyday life of children and their families topsy-turvy due to blood glucose testing, insulin injections, thorough calculation of meals, etc. It takes time before all these new and often frightening procedures become part of the daily routine of small diabetics.

Photo

CARDIOVIT CS-200 - new design and additional features

CS-200: SCHILLER´s complete Diagnostic Solution has been redesigned, offering now even more added value. Discreet but important external modifications encompass a large, swivel-mounted 19`` monitor, as well as an ergonomic design. A new, simplified user-interface as well as various new holders and mounting kits for external devices such as gel bottles, bar code scanners, spirometry sensors and…

Photo

Hospital architecture

Swanke Hayden Connell Architects (SHCA), an award-winning practice that specializes in workplace consulting, architecture and interior design, has eight offices in Europe, America and Russia and has designed healthcare environments throughout the UK, Europe, North America and the Middle East. Among these is the £300 million King's Mill Hospital, a PFI institution now under construction in…

Elderly care: the future

robuLAB10, a service robot designed to assist the elderly in their own homes, went on show this spring at Robobusiness 2009, in Boston, Mass. Produced by the French firm Robosoft and SRI International in the USA, the robot integrates SRI's Karto navigation software that enables it to navigate, follow, and assist a person from room-to-room.

Futures: HIV self-monitoring

HIV/AIDS has reached pandemic proportions. 35 million people are infected. Given the situation of hard pressed general practitioners (GPs) today, as well as geographical and other difficulties (as in Africa, for example), a new device that will enable HIV patients to monitor their own health and the effectiveness of treatments, without visiting their doctors so often, is indeed promising.

Photo

2009 International Neuro-rehabilitation Symposium (INRS)

“My dream is that children with neurological motion disorders will travel through virtual worlds with the help of a robotic gait orthosis. For example, they might explore a farm, smelling the country air and hearing the chickens cluck; while this is happening, the robot would provide them with physiological gait training”, said Professor Paolo Bonato, Director of the Motion Analysis…

Photo

Surgical lights gain LED technology

The popularity of LED lighting units is inevitably increasing because LED light is infrared-free and cool, creating good work conditions for surgeons, and minimising the danger of tissue dehydration. In addition, the nearly limitless service life of LEDs lowers maintenance costs and ensures safe, reliable work, the operating theatre equipment and surgical lighting specialist Berchtold explains.

Photo

Non-invasive applications in clinics

If a patient is delivered to the clinic with pulmonary complications, the clinic has to decide which type of therapy is suitable. In addition to purely medical aspects other criteria also play an important role such as: the mental and physical stress on the patient due to the treatment, the time it takes to implement a measure and the overall economics of the procedure.

Photo

New product from Sony launched at MEDICA

Launch of the PMW-10MD HD Camera

At MEDICA today, Sony announced the launch of the new PMW-10MD 2-piece HD camera, its first HD camera designed purely for the medical market. The camera breaks new ground offering unbeatable image quality for high precision surgical applications.

Computer assisted surgery, a synonym for new techniques being pursued in clinical practice

Surgical interventions are not radically altered by computer assistance but the quality and quantity of diagnostic information is continuously increasing leading to more transparency for patients. Therefore there is an increased demand on surgeons to improve the quality of therapeutic methods, operate with high precision and excellent reproducibility and document their work.

Photo

Cardiohelp

Maquet has launched Cardiohelp, the world's smallest, lightest heart-lung machine, that can not only provide a total therapy solution for heart surgery, cardiology, intensive and emergency care, but also, due to its suitcase size and 10 kg weigh, the device can be carried by just one person onto a helicopter or ambulance for mobile use.

Photo

Touch-less hand disinfection

Saraya, the 50-year-old Japanese hygiene products specialist, is presenting the revised version of model UD 1000 - of which 150,000 have been sold worldwide.

Photo

Cardiohelp

Maquet has launched Cardiohelp, the world's smallest, lightest heart-lung machine, that can not only provide a total therapy solution for heart surgery, cardiology, intensive and emergency care, but also, due to its suitcase size and 10 kg weigh, the device can be carried by just one person onto a helicopter or ambulance for mo-bile use.

Photo

Further increase in number of exhibitors

The COMPAMED, the leading specialist international trade fair for suppliers to the medical manufacturing market, is held parallel to the MEDICA, the world's largest medical trade fair, each year and showcases the dynamism and innovative power of the medical technology sector. The COMPAMED 2008, High tech solutions for medical technology, will, with around 500 exhibitors from 30 nations, once…

Photo

Personalise healthcare!

The Old Dominion University in Virginia and Regensburg University Medical Center in Germany are jointly organizing an international conference to discuss recent advances and strategic needs in personalised healthcare (pHealth) care and to foster collaboration between industry and academia.

Photo

Always under doctor's control

A pressure sensor that is implanted into the heart works with an electronic monitoring system that wirelessly measures patient's pulmonary artery pressure. It allows physicians to track the patient's pulmonary artery pressure while they remain at home

Photo

A "palm" for biodetection

Scientists in Singapore are reporting their development of a complete, palm-sized sensor that can detect disease-causing microbes, toxins, and other biological threats instantly without the need for an external power source or a computer.

Photo

More reliability in the lab

An innovative robotic sample management system developed by the SME-led PMS project carries out complex sample transport operations rapidly and with a high level of reliability. It includes a new transport system based on magnetic hover railway technologies, a new laboratory information system and a special selective analyser. PMS partners are now predicting a substantial market share for their…

Photo

Bayer HealthCare glucose monitoring system climbs the top

Bayer loves sports. Therefore it developes medical devices to work under extremes. Recently extrem-athlete and diabetic Geri Winkler conquered the Seven Summits - a group of mountains comprising the highest peaks on each of the seven continents. The blood glucose monitoring system from Bayer HealthCare is always with him.

Photo

FUNDRAISING

When the Oxford Radclife Hospitals NHS Trust invested £109 million in its new Oxford Children's Hospital, funding for certain special embellishments could not be contemplated. Thus a £15 million Campaign was launched to enable the hospital to be built and equipped far beyond the NHS standard. £13.8 million of that target has so far been received. Who raised that astonishing sum? Its…

Photo

Non-invasive device detects early-stage respiratory irregularities

Evolving from an award-winning project carried out by undergraduates of the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Israel's leading University for science and technology, a new non-invasive device for detecting early stage respiratory irregularities is momentarily in development. The novel respiration monitor is intended to immediately detect deterioration in lung ventilation of ICU patients.

Photo

tennessee - The convenient one!

ulrich medical is an independent medium-sized company with worldwide sales of innovative products in the field of medical technology. For 25 years ulrich contrast agent injectors are reliable partners for radiological clinics and practices. They ensure optimal contrast agent injection for computer and magnetic resonance tomography.

Photo

Stresspilot navigates to a healthier life

"Be active and live healthy!" You would love to do that but you are too busy just trying to juggle your daily life? Help might be underway: the Stress Pilot. Developed by Biocomfort and presented at this year's MEDICA, the Stress Pilot is a software solution to monitor and reduce personal stress levels. Thus, the product offers an important contribution to the prevention of…

Photo

At a glance

Where are the most high-tech start-ups? That`s an easy one: Silicon Valley. But who comes in a close second? Surprisingly: Israel. Further: Israel ranks Number 1 in terms of availability of scientists and engineers and Number 2 in quality of higher education. The result of this impressive track record is a wide range of successful enterprises and products, particularly related to the life…

Photo

COMPAMED 2007

Micro and medical technology are growing together and driving one another on to new developments. According to a survey by IVAM, the Professional Association for Microtechnology (Dortmund), medical technology is the principal target sector for European microtechnology companies, with a clear lead on the telecommunication and electronic industries.

Photo

Magnetic Field Imaging improves cardiac diagnostics

Magnetic Field Imaging (MFI) provides cardiologists with an additional tool to detect arrythmia and irregular cardiac blood flow and thus contributes to a more precise diagnosis. While an ECG acquires electric signals produced by the activity of the cardiac muscle, MFI measures the electrophysical function of the heart by determining the magnetic field during a heartbeat.

Photo

Magnetic Field Imaging improves cardiac diagnostics

Magnetic Field Imaging (MFI) provides cardiologists with an additional tool to detect arrythmia and irregular cardiac blood flow and thus contributes to a more precise diagnosis. While an ECG acquires electric signals produced by the activity of the cardiac muscle, MFI measures the electrophysical function of the heart by determining the magnetic field during a heartbeat.

Photo

Neuropelveology

Forging links between neurology and surgery

Surgery in the lower pelvic region often involves injury to or severing of nerve tissue. As in chronic diseases of the nervous system, the result can be pain, sensory disturbances or loss of function. Up to now the poor view of the nerves, partially formed of fine interwoven networks, has been one of the major problems – exacerbated by the strict division of skills between neurologists and…

Photo

Schizophrenia

Imaging water molecules in the brain correlates structural and functional deficits

Photo

AACC emphasises preventive diagnostics

San Diego, California - 20,000 international physicians, scientists and other visitors travelled to the Annual Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo of the American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) in July, and 750 exhibitors emphasised the increasing importance of this gathering

Photo

Innovative solution for hearing loss

Otologics' Carina could improve the quality of life for patients suffering from hearing loss. The fully implantable hearing device uses a transducer to move the middle ear bones - much like the eardrum causes the middle ear bones to vibrate in response to sound wave. Carina implantation surgery takes about three hours and is an easy procedure with low surgical risks. (The whole article is only…

Photo

Tomorrow's imaging on today's horizon

"Tomosynthesis is a hot topic in all the companies involved in mammography", Professor Danielsson pointed out. "But whereas they are developing more or less the same thing, Sectra has a totally different concept - photon-counting - a unique technology that, for the first time, processes X-rays one by one."

Photo

3D USCT nears reality

Back in the 70s, when scientists first speculated on the development of 3-D ultrasound computed tomography (3-D USCT) the available technology could not equal their dreams. Now, before the end of 2007, a prototype at Germany's Karlsruhe Research Centre will be used for the first in-vivo tests.

Photo

Expanding medical horizons

This was the motto of the ECR 2007 in Vienna, where a group of high-ranking experts discussed diseases of the 21st century; research competition between the US and Europe; the conditions needed to progress leading medical R&D - moderated by Congress President Professor Christian J Herold.

Photo

Discovering Toshiba

Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation is a global medical solutions company covering research and development, manufacture, sales and service for medical diagnostic X-ray systems, CT scanners, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, nuclear medicine systems, as well as healthcare IT systems and radiation therapy equipment. Daniela Zimmermann, of European Hospital, recently visited Toshiba's…

Photo

For use with microscopes

The new Olympus E-330 micro-imaging system for microscopy includes the world's first digital SLR camera to show real-time frame images on the LCD, the company reports. `The system is based around a 7.5 Megapixel sensor, which together with an array of unique features delivers incredibly sharp and vibrant images directly onto a 2.5 inch high-resolution colour LCD. Other features of the micro…

Photo

EU project is financing the electronic nurse

Good news for overworked hospital staff: Maybe in just a few years they will be supported by little robots that could clean up the sickrooms, look for the doctor or show visitors the right way. A new EU project led by the Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Engineering IAO should make this scenario possible.

Photo

Back to bed safely

Patients can be unpredictable and, if they leave their beds, some might come to harm if their movements go unnoticed. WeSpot SecNurse, a new monitoring sysem produced by the Dutch firm Secumatic, transmits an alarm to an existing nurse call system when its sensor detects a patient's departure from bed.

Photo

The Vela Diamond

Another introduction at the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine Congress, in Spain, was the Vela Diamond mechanical ventilator platform made by Viasys Healthcare.

Photo

40th anniversary

As the German Society of Neuroradiology 40th annual meeting approached (Venue: Dresden. 31 August - 3 September), Professors Martin Schumacher (Freiburg), President of the German Society of Neuroradiology (GSN) and Rüdiger von Kummer (Dresden), the meeting's President, examine the history and potential in this medical field

Photo

IGS

In our last issue we featured the Future Operating Room Project developed at St Olavs Hospital, University Hospital of Trondheim, Norway, a collaboration between the hospital and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. There, highly promising research on navigation is being carried out in co-peration with the research foundation Sintef Health Research. Professor of Surgery Hans O…

Photo

Touch-less sensor dispenser

The Japanese firm Saraya, which for 50 years has successfully manufactured hygiene products and programmes for healthcare, facility management and the food industry, has launched a touch-less hand disinfection unit in Europe. According to Mr ter Woort, General Manager, Saraya Europe, the company has already sold over 100,000 of these units in Asia & the USA.

Photo

Biochip for the early detection of cancer

The Innsbruck Biocentre, led by Professor Lukas Huber, is involved in a major European research project. This involves the development of a 'biological interface' for a new semiconductor developed by Siemens.

Rapid growth in wearable wireless monitoring

Wireless networking, already widely adopted by healthcare facilities across Germany, France and the United Kingdom, is set for "rapid growth", according to a report by the global market consultancy firm Frost & Sullivan (F&S). More emphasis on home care, plus heightened awareness of the benefits of remote monitoring, and technological developments that improve patient…

Photo

Biometric authentication

Biometry, or the technical recognition of physical characteristics, is playing an increasingly important role in clinics and hospitals. By Thomas Bengs, Product Manager for Vein, Fujitsu Europe Limited Group

Subscribe to Newsletter