Kidney

Photo

News • Success of aRCC treatment

New biomarker to better predict immunotherapy response in kidney cancer

Immunotherapy increases survival rates in kidney cancer, but does not work for everyone. A research team developed a new method to predict which patients will benefit from it.

Photo

News • Study analyses admissions in Spain

Summer heat sends more people into hospital, study finds

Metabolic disorders, renal failure, UTIs, sepsis, poisoning: The higher temperatures climb in summer, the more people are hospitalized, a study shows - with some groups being more at risk than others.

Photo

News • Clear cell renal cell cancer

Same-day imaging for ccRCC kidney cancer with new PET agent

A new study suggests superiority of the novel investigational PET imaging agent ⁶⁸Ga-DPI-4452 (Debio 0328) to standard CT imaging in the context of clear cell renal cell cancer (ccRCC).

Photo

News • Contrast agent-free imaging of complex structures

Ultrafast ultrasound breaks new ground in imaging kidney vessels

A Korean research team has advanced the imaging of kidney diseases using ultrafast ultrasound that captures 1,000 images in just one second.

Photo

News • Study examines diagnostic quality

Ultrasound in obese patients: special probes improve imaging

High-BMI patients are a challenge for abdominal sonography. In a new study, researchers point out the benefits of special high-performance probes and their impact on image quality.

Photo

News • Bioreactor approach

Can an artificial kidney free patients from dialysis?

A new approach to treating kidney failure could one day free people from needing dialysis or having to take harsh drugs to suppress their immune system after a transplant.

Photo

Article • WSI, AI and more

New digital frontiers for nephrology

Digital technology solutions create new opportunities in diagnosis and assessment of renal conditions. With whole slide imaging (WSI), improved workflow and better visualization, such technology already yields a ROI for hospitals and laboratories.

Photo

News • Nephrolith research

Fatty liver disease promotes formation of kidney stones

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in western countries, with an increasing incidence worldwide. Consequences of NAFLD can also include kidney disease and kidney stones, although the mechanisms for the development of these kidney complications as a result of NAFLD have not yet been fully explained. Researchers at the Leibniz Research Centre for Working…

Photo

News • Nanoparticle-based contrast agent SAIO

New MRI contrast agent to improve upon gadolinium-based products

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely used to identify the narrowing or blockage of blood vessels. Contrast agents improve the visibility of the structures and offer more accurate information of vascular conditions such as vascular blockage and stenosis. Commonly used gadolinium-based contrast agents must be administered in chelated forms due to the gadolinium ions' high toxicity and pose…

Photo

News • Immersion is key

Hemodialysis: Virtual reality lessens side effects

Hemodialysis patients routinely experience side effects such as fatigue, lightheadedness and nausea during their treatment sessions. But patients in a study who used a virtual reality program to engage in a mindfulness/meditation exercise reported that these treatment-related symptoms were greatly reduced. Patients in the study wore a head-mounted virtual reality display to participate in a…

Photo

News • Lipids, lysosomes, and autophagy

Researchers find the keys to preventing kidney injury

Human cells need to work like well-oiled machines to keep our bodies running as they should. Waste products such as misfolded proteins, damaged cellular components, and carbohydrates get in the way and must be quickly disposed of. Dealing with this cellular “trash” are spherical, membrane-bound organelles called lysosomes filled with a mixture of potent enzymes. In a process called autophagy,…

Photo

News • Hemolysis monitoring

Measuring blood damage in real-time

Scientists at the University of Delaware and Princeton University have developed a method to monitor blood damage in real-time. “Our goal was to find a method that could detect red blood cell damage without the need for lab sample testing,” said Tyler Van Buren, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering with expertise in fluid dynamics. The researchers recently reported their technique…

Photo

News • Nephritis as a marker

Kidney an early warning sign for severe COVID-19 cases

A course of action to early detect and treat severe courses of COVID-19 infections has been developed by an expert-team of the University Medical Center Goettingen (UMG). A simple urine test is intended to help medical professionals to recognize warning signs of future decompensation of COVID-19 infections earlier. With the help of a few parameters, the treatment of imminent complications can…

40 show more articles
Subscribe to Newsletter