Diagnostic imaging

Radiology, sonography and beyond: Keep reading to find out how imaging techniques like MRI, CT and ultrasound can be used in the diagnosis of diseases and the guidance of medical procedures.

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European awareness

Call for greater EU focus on lung cancer

Under the auspices of the Member of the European Parliament (MEP) Claudia Gamon, the European Society of Radiology (ESR), the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and Lung Cancer Europe (LuCE) have…

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Digitalization

Healthcare: confidence in cloud computing grows

Consider the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities resulting from access to pertinent data from thousands of anonymized patient medical scans. What new patterns, options, or evidence for actionable insights could be derived from all this information? Cloud-based data is easily accessible via computer, smartphone, or tablet and is a valuable complement to the insights from the millions of…

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Transferring research into daily routine

AI possibilities and probabilities

Although some people foresee artificial intelligence (AI) easing medical workloads, many challenges arise before that dream can begin. Dr Felix Nensa and Dr Bram Stieltjes described such hurdles in an ‘Artificial Intelligence in Medical Imaging’ session held during a SITEM School Symposium in Bern, Switzerland. Whilst AI has potential, actually delivering that asset in to routine medical practice remains a major challenge. Recent discussing ‘Translational AI – from bits to bedside’, radiologist Dr Felix Nensa, from Essen University Hospital in Germany, pointed to headlines that AI had helped to save lives, or that machines were supposedly better than radiologists, but, he noted, the tone of those headlines have been changing – indicating a peak in AI development.

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GERICARE research programme

Evaluating the benefits of point-of-care ultrasound for geriatric medicine

Dr Nicolas Azulay is a general medicine doctor specialising in scheduled and emergency ultrasound examinations at the University Hospitals of Nice, where he works at the Pasteur II and Cimiez…

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Digital tomosynthesis

Carestream previews DT innovations at RSNA

Carestream will introduce a three-dimensional extension of general radiography through its Digital Tomosynthesis (DT) functionality (Pending FDA 510(k) clearance) at this year’s Radiological…

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Minimally invasive

Improved biopsies with MRI-compatible ultrasound system

Biopsies are standard procedures in interventional radiology, not least for patients with a suspected tumor. In this instance, MRI is increasingly the method of choice for guiding minimally invasive…

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POC imaging

Introducing a point-of-care MRI system

The world’s first low-cost, point-of-care (POC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system was presented by Hyperfine Research Inc. at the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) Scientific…

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Report by the British Institute of Radiology

AI is the future of imaging

Medical and professional leaders in radiology overwhelmingly believe artificial intelligence (AI) will be the most positive development for their sector and their professions in the coming decade,…

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Thyroid cancer and meningioma

Dental X-rays may increase cancer risk

Research by team at Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS) showed that repeated exposures to dental X-rays may be associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer and meningioma. About 3,500…

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Inhalation visualised

New imaging tech gives insights into pulmonary drug delivery

Inhalation therapy is widely used for the treatment of lung diseases. Targeting of drugs to the site of disease is a major goal to improve drug efficacy and minimize side effects. Scientists at the…

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Radiology research

Tuned X-rays for safer, more precise cancer radiation therapy

X-rays could be tuned to deliver a more effective punch that destroys cancer cells and not harm the body, researches from Kyoto University find. Gadolinium delivered into cancer cells releases killer…

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UK tests high-speed remote medical diagnosis

Ultrasound scanning via a 5G network

To demonstrate advances in 5G connectivity for healthcare, a UK team has linked a paramedic in a simulated ambulance to a hospital-based clinician. The paramedic wore a robotic or ‘haptic’ glove,…

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Colorectal cancer

Harmful to women? Expert questions new screening recommendation

The British Medical Journal (BMJ) published a new recommendation on colorectal cancer screening on October 2nd, 2019. The main point: Screening participation is only recommended to people with at…

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Statement from ESR and major North American radiology organisations

On the ethics of AI in radiology

Experts in the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in radiology, from many of the world’s leading radiology, medical physics and imaging informatics groups, published an aspirational statement to…

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Better image quality with fewer sensors

Machine learning improves biomedical imaging

Scientists at ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich have used machine learning methods to improve optoacoustic imaging. This relatively young medical imaging technique can be used for applications…

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Biomarker

A real-time MRI method for the early detection of stroke

An international research group at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics developed a brain imaging method for improved and early assessment of stroke. Their study presents a methodology…

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Cancer of unknown primary

CUP: in search for the smoking gun

Cancer of unknown primary (CUP) can send radiologists on a frustrating scavenger hunt: metastases were detected but the primary cancer is nowhere to be seen. Professor Alwin Krämer, Head of the…

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Onvision needle tip tracking

A breakthrough in real-time ultrasound guidance for regional anesthesia

Royal Philips and B. Braun Melsungen AG announced the launch of Onvision, a breakthrough ultrasound guidance solution for real-time needle tip tracking in regional anesthesia. Available on the latest…

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Endoscopy solution

It’s time for colonoscopy and gastroscopy in 3D

Minimally-invasive surgery (MIS) benefits from 3D visualization with improved image quality and depth perception. Now, a 3D solution for gastroscopy and colonoscopy is available, by simply connecting…

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Workflow automation

Loop-X: Imaging robot for spinal surgery

Brainlab recently unveiled its flagship Loop-X mobile intraoperative imaging robot that is specifically designed for spinal surgical procedures. Developed by medPhoton, an Austrian company, the…

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4K medical cameras gain ISO 13485 Certification

Ultra-compact surgical imaging

On show at Medica is an expanded range of medical cameras with 4K enhanced-dynamic-range monitor displays. Their manufacturer, Ikegami, reports that its model MKC-750UHD delivers very high-quality…

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In-depth exams for injured mountaineers

Ultrasound climbs the heights

Dr Philippe Mahiou practices anaesthesia in the Grenoble area, splitting his time between a private clinic and working as a helicopter doctor to attend mountaineering accidents. As part of his work, Mahiou routinely uses ultrasound, and understands the importance of the technology to guide anaesthesia in the operating room and assess patients in the field. When anaesthetist Dr Philippe Mahiou…

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Ultrasound in intracranial injuries

A future gold standard tool

Whilst researchers acknowledge ultrasound, when used as a tool to assess intracranial pressure in an emergency, is not a replacement for current gold standard invasive approaches, they believe it has enormous potential as a non-invasive and fast, cost-effective, and patient-friendly way to assess possible brain injury at a patient’s bedside. Consultant anaesthetist Dr Chiara Robba, a specialist…

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Artificial intelligence

Superlative future assistance

As a member of the European Congress of Radiology (ECR) planning committee Professor Elmar Kotter suffered no serious challenge in pinpointing subject matter for the IT sessions. More than 300 submissions were received on artificial intelligence (AI). From the presentations, Kotter, Professor of Radiology and Senior Consultant at the Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, at the…

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X-ray parts

CE Mark for ALTA750 CT replacement tube

Richardson Healthcare announced it has received CE Mark approval for its ALTA750 X-Ray Tube, a form, fit and function replacement for the Canon/Toshiba CXB-750D/4A. Richardson ships the tube with a new cable and heat exchanger, and offers a full warranty. The CE Mark confirms that the product meets the requirements of the European Medical Device Directive, and signals conformity to patient and…

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POCUS

Point-of-care ultrasound – a valuable tool for nephrology

Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) systems are becoming a common sight in nephrology departments and renal dialysis clinics, helping clinical staff to evaluate and effectively access the vasculature of dialysis patients. Dr Jean-Yves Bosc, a nephrologist and vascular doctor working at the non-profit private health establishment AIDER SANTÉ in the South of France, has been a champion of ultrasound…

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Cardiology & radiology

AI opens up boundaries between medical disciplines

Uwe Joseph Schoepf, Professor for Radiology, Cardiology and Paediatrics and Director of the Department of Cardiovascular Imaging at the Medical University of South Carolina, discusses areas of application for AI-based radiology. The cardiothoracic imaging expert and his team were largely involved in the development and early clinical trials of the Siemens AI-Rad Companion Chest CT, a software…

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High tissue contrast, spatial detail, complete tissue characterisation

MRI shows cardiac diagnostic value

Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging has become faster, simpler and more widely available in recent years because it has evolved to deliver effective assessment and diagnosis of a range of heart conditions with expanding guideline indications. ‘MRI is the reference test for anatomical imaging of the heart, for quantifying chamber sizes and function,’ explains Professor Sven Plein,…

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Tricuspid insufficiency

Healing the heart’s right chambers

Most people think their heart is located on the left side of their chest, and this is also the direction science has looked, so far. However, just as the heart sits at the centre of the chest, disease also affects the right side of the organ. Cardiologists must now look right to improve patient prognosis, according to Professor José Luis Zamorano, Vice President of the European Society of…

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ESC consensus statement

Intracoronary imaging advances

Interventional cardiologists have been aware of the value of intracoronary (IC) imaging in clinical practice for more than twenty years. However, recent developments and improvements in modalities and software have enabled huge strides in its range and scope for both diagnostic assessment and in percutaneous coronary interventions. Imaging options now include intravascular ultrasound (IVUS),…

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Contrast agent in cola drinks

Gadolinium found in fast food restaurants

It has been found in many rivers and even in the tap water in some German cities, now scientists detected gadolinium from contrast agents in the food chain. A research group headed by Michael Bau, Professor of Geoscience at Jacobs University Bremen, detected the gadolinium in tap water and in cola soft drinks bought in restaurants of well-known fast-food franchises in Berlin, Dresden,…

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Spotting scar muscles of the heart

New MRI technique saves kidneys from gadolinium damage

Traditional MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scans use the metal gadolinium, which resonates areas of the heart muscles that are not functioning efficiently. However, gadolinium affects the Kidney function. A new 3D MRI computing technique developed by scientists at the University of Warwick calculates strain in heart muscles showing which muscles are not functioning enough without damaging other…

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100th birthday of Sir Godfrey Newbold Hounsfield

The legacy of the man who pioneered computed tomography

On the centenary of his birth, Mark Nicholls reflects on the life and legacy of Nobel laureate Sir Godfrey Newbold Hounsfield, the man who pioneered computed tomography. It was a discovery that came from a moment of inspiration during a country walking holiday; the idea that one could determine what was inside a box by taking X-ray readings at all angles around the object. From that, Sir Godfrey…

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Target in sight

MRI scans improve prostate cancer detection

Using MRI scans to target biopsies is more effective at detecting prostate cancers that are likely to need treatment than standard ultrasound guided biopsies alone, according to research published in JAMA Network Open. The research, led by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and Universities of Bristol, Ottawa, Exeter and Oxford, combined the results from seven studies covering…

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Multiscale integrative cross-disciplinary imaging

Linking pathology and radiology workflows

Pathologic-radiologic correlation is already utilised in various settings as a tool to assess the interpretive performance of imaging studies and identify radiologic features corresponding to histologic findings. However, correlative assessment is currently limited mainly to the fields of research and quality assurance, and is generally not a routine element of the radiologist or pathologist…

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CAS 'Artificial Intelligence in Medical imaging'

Advance your AI skills in Bern

The School for Translational Medicine and Biomedical Entrepreneurship (sitem-insel School) in Bern, Switzerland, offers a new Certificate of Advanced Studies (CAS) in Artificial Intelligence in Medical Imaging. The course aims to equip Medical Doctors (MDs) with the necessary skills to take a leading role in the AI-driven transformation of medicine. The course program was developed for medical…

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Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry

Hydration sensor could improve dialysis

For patients with kidney failure who need dialysis, removing fluid at the correct rate and stopping at the right time is critical. This typically requires guessing how much water to remove and carefully monitoring the patient for sudden drops in blood pressure. Currently there is no reliable, easy way to measure hydration levels in these patients, who number around half a million in the United…

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COCIR and EFOMP partner up

Training initiative on angiographic equipment

Earlier this July, 75 Medical Physics Experts gathered in Prague to attend the EFOMP and COCIR Summer School “State of the art & new trends of angiographic equipment: Image quality, Patient and Staff dosimetry”, endorsed by the European Society of Radiology (ESR). The Summer School was organised in collaboration with the Czech Association of Medical Physicists and the Department of…

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Roentgen Professorship 2020

Inspiring young radiologists to take up research

Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital (NNUH) Consultant Radiologist Tom Turmezei has been awarded the prestigious Royal College of Radiologists’ Roentgen Professorship for 2020, a role created to encourage trainee radiologists across the UK to participate in research. “Research is absolutely key to making discoveries that will improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients in the…

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"Alliance for Precision Health”

Missouri University partners up with Siemens

Siemens Healthineers, University of Missouri System (UM System) and University of Missouri Health Care (MU Health Care) launch "Alliance for Precision Health.” The ten-year collaboration will bring the partners’ expertise together to improve health care in Missouri State, promote education and launch research initiatives. Among other things, the clinic receives the only 7 Tesla MRI…

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Autoimmune disease

Detecting rheumatoid arthritis with infrared light

A new way of detecting rheumatoid arthritis using infrared light could offer an objective way of diagnosing the disease and monitoring treatment effectiveness, a University of Birmingham study shows. The rapid, non-invasive technique could help clinicians diagnose the disease earlier, and assess how effectively the selected treatment is controlling the progression of the disease. Rheumatoid…

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Travel medicine

Parasites & company – the radiologists' view

Sunburn and happy memories are not the only things we can bring home from a holiday. Sometimes parasites, fungi, viruses or bacteria from distant countries accompany our return, later to become noticeable in unpleasant ways, often to pose a real health threat. At the German Radiology Congress in Leipzig, Dr André Lollert and colleagues ventured into the world of tropical and travel medicine. The…

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Radiation meter

A powerful tool to measure radiation

Radiation measurement often requires different devices for varying applications adding to the cost and complexity of data collection. The new RaySafe 452 Survey Meter is a versatile, powerful tool that can be used for multiple situations, reducing the number of devices technicians need to carry, learn, and calibrate. The 452 Survey Meter is the ideal tool to measure radiation in a wide variety of…

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