Reinforced learning

AI masters tightrope walk of cancer treatment dosage

Using a new approach called 'reinforced learning', researchers have taught an artificial intelligence (AI) to responsibly choose the right amount of chemo- and radiotherapy for glioblastoma patients.…

Product of the Month

Olympus BX46 microscope – Protecting operators with ergonomics

In microscopy, ergonomics is particularly important as long periods at the microscope put unusually specific constraints on posture. In certain roles, such as in pathology, microscopy forms a…

Cerebrovascular disease

Stroke deaths decrease all over Europe – but it's too early to cheer

New research, published in the European Heart Journal, has shown deaths from conditions that affect the blood supply to the brain, such as stroke, are declining overall in Europe but that in some countries the decline is levelling off or death rates are even increasing. Cerebrovascular disease includes strokes, mini-strokes, and narrowing, blockage or rupturing of the blood vessels supplying blood to the brain, and it is the second single largest cause of death in Europe after heart disease, accounting for 9% of deaths in men and 12% of deaths in women each year.

New study

Rethinking the six-hour rule for stroke victims

Neurologist who coined the phrase "Time is Brain" says message is not so simple anymore. Rather there should be no hard-and-fast rule governing when therapy can be given because strokes…

Personalised drug treatment

AI approach to help myeloma patients

A multidisciplinary team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed an artificial intelligence (AI) technology platform that could potentially change the way drug…

Latest headlines

Siemens Healthineers reports strong comparable revenue growth

After its admission into TecDAX, Siemens Healthineers AG posted solid growth in revenue for the third quarter: Supported by the robust increase in the Imaging segment, revenue rose by five percent on a comparable basis over the third quarter last year; in absolute figures revenue was stable at EUR 3.3 billion. Adversely affected by significantly negative currency effects, the adjusted profit margin was 16.0 percent. Adjusted profit amounted to EUR 528 million, with adjusted net income reaching EUR 334 million. Earnings per share are at EUR 0.29. Atellica Solution deliveries are being accelerated and remain on schedule with more than 560 systems delivered up to the end of the third quarter. More details on the Q3 report on the Siemens Healthineers website.


David Westgate new Chairman, President and CEO of Carestream Health

David C. Westgate has been named the new Chairman, President and CEO of Carestream Health, a provider of medical imaging systems and healthcare IT solutions. Mr. Westgate previously served as CEO of Jason Industries, Inc., where he led successful efforts to diversify the company’s portfolio while emphasizing a culture of growth and innovation. “Dave has an impressive record of success in corporate leadership roles and his vision for Carestream is clear: move the company toward long-term growth and market leadership, and drive continuous innovation across the company’s broad portfolio of products,” said Robert Le Blanc, a Senior Managing Director of Onex Corporation. Mr. Westgate replaces Kevin Hobert who had decided to leave the company and will assist with the transition.


US: Rapid rise in deaths from liver disease over the last decade

Researchers detected a rapid rise in deaths due to liver disease in the US since 2009, especially in young people, driven predominantly by alcohol use. They point out a possible correlation with the global financial crisis and subsequent economic recession in the US, which began in 2008. After the examination of death certificate data for nearly 600,000 adults, the researchers found that deaths due to cirrhosis increased by 65% (from 20,661 in 1999 to 34,174 in 2016) and deaths due to liver cancer doubled (from 5,112 in 1999 to 11,073 in 2016). Men had twice as many cirrhosis related deaths and four times as many liver cancer related deaths than women. The study can be found on the website of the British Medical Journal (BMJ).


Mobile devices are taking over healthcare

Medical device company Carestream Health has published an interesting piece about the increasing capabilities of mobile devices in healthcare. Click here to read the article on Carestream's "Everything Rad" blog.


ESHG welcomes the Council of Europe’s new protocol on genetic testing

The Council of Europe’s protocol on genetic testing for health purposes* came into force on Sunday, July 1st. The protocol, an addition to the Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine, lays down rules on the conduct of genetic tests, including direct-to-consumer testing. It specifies the conditions under which tests may be carried out on persons not able to consent, with particular attention to children, and addresses privacy issues and the right to information obtained through genetic testing. It also covers counselling and screening.
The protocol enters into force thanks to its ratification by five Council of Europe member states (Norway, Montenegro, the Republic of Moldova, Slovenia and Portugal). It has also been signed by five others – the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Iceland and Luxembourg.
“At a time when genetics and genomics are advancing so rapidly, issues surrounding genetic testing take on an even greater importance than before,” says ESHG President Professor Gunnar Houge, University of Bergen, Norway. “New technologies and discoveries provide huge potential for the improvement of human health, but alongside that can go the potential for misuse. The ESHG therefore welcomes the Council of Europe protocol and believes that it will be an important factor in ensuring that genetic progress continues to be applied in the most ethical way possible to the benefit of all concerned.”

*https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2986683/pdf/ejhg200984a.pdf).


GE to spin off healthcare division

General Electric (GE) has announced it will spin off its healthcare business over the next 12 to 18 months, and sell its Baker Hughes stake over two to three years. This move is effectively breaking up the 126-year-old conglomerate which was once the most valuable U.S. corporation and a global symbol of American business power. Detailed information on the breakup can be found at Reuters.

Boxers or briefs?

Why getting rid of tighty-whities is good for your fertility

Researchers have discovered a good reason to not wear tight-fitting underwear – beyond the obvious aspect of fashion: According to new research led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, men…

Morbus Charcot-Marie-Tooth

CMT: Unlikely ally against deadly neuropathy

Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common hereditary neuropathy and affects more than two million people worldwide. In Germany, at least 30.000 people suffer from CMT which belongs to the…

Sodium consumption

Daily salt intake: How much is too much for our heart?

New research shows that for the vast majority of individuals, sodium consumption does not increase health risks except for those who eat more than five grams a day, the equivalent of 2.5 teaspoons of…

Autophagy

Pathway Ebola virus uses to enter cells pinpointed

The new outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus declared just last week in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo is believed to have claimed more than 30 victims so far, highlighting the continued urgency…

Fairs & congresses

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Products from Radbook

Mobile X-ray

VILLA SISTEMI MEDICALI - Visitor T4

VILLA SISTEMI MEDICALI s.p.a.

Accessories / Complementary systems

GCTechnology - CIRS Phantoms

GCTechnologyGmbH

Ultrasound

Samsung - PT60A

SAMSUNG MEDISON CO., LTD.

DR

Canon - Radrex-i

Canon Europa NV

Ultrasound

Samsung - RS80A with Prestige

SAMSUNG MEDISON CO., LTD.

Surgical flat panel C-arms

Medtronic - O-arm System

Medtronic International Trading Sàrl

Products from Labbook

Blood cell counter

Sysmex - XN-L Series

Sysmex Europe GmbH

Research use only (RUO)

Eppendorf - BioSpectrometer fluroescence

Eppendorf AG

Immunochemistry

Fujirebio - LUMIPULSE G1200

Fujirebio Europe NV

Mass spectrometry

Bruker Daltonics - MBT smart

Bruker Daltonik GmbH

Printer

Primera Technology - Signature Slide Printer

Primera Technology Europe

Wearables

Smart wristband could monitor personal health

Rutgers University–New Brunswick engineers have created a smart wristband with a wireless connection to smartphones that will enable a new wave of personal health and environmental monitoring…

Hospital hygiene

Will resistant bacteria be the end of alcohol hand sanitizers?

Alcohol-based hand sanitisers have been a mainstay in hospital hygiene for decades. But now, strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria show signs of overcoming these handwashing agents as well. Does…

Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

Taking a pill can effectively treat brutal lung disease

Researchers Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center report that they figured out why air sacs in the lungs clog up with a thick substance called surfactant in a brutal disease called Pulmonary…

Mysterious illness

Potential diagnostic test for Kawasaki disease

For the first time, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Imperial College London, with international collaborators, have determined that Kawasaki disease (KD) can…

Henipaviruses

Lethal viruses hijack cellular defences against cancer

Monash University’s Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI) researchers have identified a new mechanism used by Henipaviruses in infection, and potential new targets for antivirals to treat them.…

AACC Disruptive Technology Award

Developers take diagnostics to the patient

Over the last several years, technological advancements have enabled the development of tests that can be performed right where the patient is, whether that’s in a hospital room, primary care…

Neural development

Why our brains fold the way they do

Everyone knows what our brains look like – but why is it folded up like that? Looking at other species reveals much less folding or even none at all. Scientists in Dresden, Germany, have now taken…

Gastroenterology

High-fat diet can cause pancreatic cancer – but there's hope

A high-fat diet may promote the growth of pancreatic cancer independent of obesity because of the interaction between dietary fat and cholecystokinin (CCK), a digestive hormone. In addition, blocking…