Photo

News • Research on biomechanics

Tumour 'softness' can drive aggressiveness of breast cancer

Researchers have discovered how the mechanical properties of tumours - their softness, for example - can prime cancer cells to better survive their spread to other organs.

Photo

Article • Pharmaceutical research

Boosting biomarker detection with digital pathology

Digital pathology can be used to great effect in pharmaceutical research: it can accelerate analyses, give deeper insights into cellular mechanisms, and enable better understanding of their role into…

Photo

News • Research on syndrome correlation

Finding the link between Guillain-Barré and Takotsubo

Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (‘broken heart syndrome’) is a known complication of Guillain-Barré, but not much is known about the association between the two. New research aims to change this.

Photo

Article • Lesion detection and mammographic texture analysis

Dual AI model to optimize breast cancer risk assessment

A team of Danish and Dutch researchers has combined an AI diagnostic tool with a mammographic texture model to improve the assessment of short- and long-term breast cancer risk. This new approach represents a significant step forward in refining the ability to predict the complexities of breast cancer risk.

Collections

Photo

Article • Focus on radiology

PACS: the central node of imaging

Radiology without a picture archiving and communication system has become unthinkable: It records and sorts image data, controls access to the files – and gains traction also in other specialties.

Photo

Article • Diagnostic imaging

Contrast agents: useful, but controversial

Many procedures in diagnostic imaging would be impossible without contrast agents: they open up insights into vascular structures, show stenoses, inflammations, aneurysms and more. However, reports…

Photo

News • Research, diagnostics, therapies

Focus on stroke

Strokes are among the most common cause of death worldwide and one of the most common causes of disability. Mortality rates are decreasing due to improving care. Nevertheless, experts expect the…

Diagnostic imaging

Radiology, sonography and beyond: Keep reading to find out how imaging techniques like MRI, CT and ultrasound can be used in the diagnosis of diseases and the guidance of medical procedures.

Photo

News • Biparametric scan

Prostate cancer screening: two-part MRI is enough, study shows

A three-part ‘multiparametric’ MRI of the prostate is standard of care in the UK for patients suspected of having prostate cancer. Now, a study shows two-part scans are sufficient for diagnosis.

Photo

Article • Prostate cancer treatment

MR-guided radiotherapy: a potential game changer

Prostate radiotherapy techniques have been transformed over the past two decades. One promisting technique in this context is magnetic resonance-guided radiotherapy. The latest clinical results show…

Photo

News • High-resolution brain imaging

11.7 Tesla: First images from the world's most powerful MRI scanner

With a field strength of 11.7 T, the Iseult MRI machine currently is the most powerful scanner of its kind. Now, the first images of a living human brain showcase impressive resolution.

Products from Radbook

Laboratory/pathology

From clinical chemistry to digital pathology: Read more about how modern medical laboratories and procedures in pathology play a vital role in the detection and prevention of diseases and in medical research.

Photo

News • Mechanistic subtypes

The telltale traces long Covid leaves in the blood

Findings from the largest UK study of patients hospitalised with Sars-CoV-2 infection show that long Covid leads to ongoing inflammation which can be detected in the blood.

Photo

News • Preventive blood test

Prostate cancer screening: Study advocates 5-year-interval

How often should men get checked for their level of PSA, a marker for prostate cancer? A German study involving over 12,500 men shows that a five-year interval between tests is safe.

Photo

News • New-found blood signatures

Multiple sclerosis: subtype discovery opens new ways for personalized therapy

Researchers discovered three distinct immunological endophenotypes of multiple sclerosis, defined by specific blood immune signatures. This opens new avenues for personalized treatment strategies.

Products from Labbook

Treatment

Medical innovations are rapidly expanding therapy options for many diseases. Keep reading to find more information on new therapies, surgical techniques, effective medication and patient care.

Photo

News • Minimally invasive procedure

Aortic valve replacement: TAVR on par with surgical approach

Decreased rates of death and stroke: new research shows the validity of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in low-risk patients. This advocates a less invasive alternative to surgical options.

Photo

News • Cardiology consensus update

Atrial fibrillation: Agreement on standards for catheter ablation

Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation is an important treatment option for heart rhythm maintenance and symptom reduction. Now, an international consensus statement reflects new techniques.

Photo

News • Omitting axillary lymph node removal

Breast cancer trial explores benefits of less extensive surgery

A new trial could pave the way for more gentle surgery of breast cancer: The researchers explore the possibility of sparing the lymph nodes in the armpit - even if metastases are already present.

Management

Time to bring out the white collars: Read more about the economy and politics of health as well as optimised hospital and patient management.

Photo

Article • Key findings of latest survey

Women’s health: solutions for a growing problem

Awareness of the importance of women’s health is on the rise, but many challenges remain: At ECR 2024 in Vienna, we spoke with Hologic about their continued evaluation of healthcare efforts for…

Photo

Article • Joint action

A pan-European effort to tackle cancer and NCDs

This February, the Norwegian Institute of Public Health officially launched the ‘Joint Action on cancer and other non-communicable disease prevention project‘ (JA PreventNCD). In the…

Photo

News • Working environment

Women in healthcare: more stress, higher burnout rates

Gender inequality, poor work-life integration, lack of support: female medical professionals are exposed to greater levels of stress and are more prone to burnout than men, a new study finds.

IT/Tech

From AI-based image analysis to virtual therapies: Find out how digitalisation and cutting-edge IT solutions advance the medical landscape.

Photo

News • Machine learning assessment

Heart transplantation: AI can provide decision-making support

Matching the right donor heart to the right recipient at the right time is a complex task. Now, experts point out how AI can provide unbiased decision-support for transplantation process.

Photo

News • Pros and cons in surgery

Robotic assistance in lung transplantation: Has the time come?

Although robots are common to assist in surgery, robotic assistance is not routinely used for lung transplants. However, this might change soon, according to an expert speaking at the ISHLT meeting.

Photo

News • Health information validity

Study: ChatGPT gets confused when confronted with good evidence

Large language models like ChatGPT have become a go-to point for health information. However, a new study uncovers a vital weakness: The AI gets confused when faced with actual scientific evidence.

Research

When scientific curiosity paves the way for improved healthcare: Read more about promising studies and trials that lead to more effective drugs, procedures as well as medical guidelines.

Photo

News • Infection control

Study highlights transmission risk of resistant bacteria in hospital sinks

A new study identifies hospital sinks as a source of bacterial outbreaks, highlighting the vulnerability for contamination. The researchers also point out the difficulties in stopping such outbreaks.

Photo

News • Microbial influence on treatment

Study explores the role of bacteria in cancer

Bacteria can help – or hinder – the treatment of cancer. How this happens, however, is largely unknown. Now, researchers have mapped bacteria in cancer metastases to shed more light on their role.

Photo

News • Promising secretory granules

New micromaterial to fight cancer with nanoparticle-targeting

A newly-developed material made of proteins shows promise for targeted cancer therapies: Like secretory granules in the endocrine system, it delivers nanoparticles which attack specific cancer cells.

healthcare-in-europe.com (HiE) - Your guide to world of medical technology in Europe

HiE is a platform for the latest trends in medical technology, innovative procedures and advances in medical research. We cover a broad range of topics from diagnostic imaging, therapy, eHealth, automation, lab and digital pathology to market trends and healthcare insights. We are your guide to the world of medical technology in hospitals and clinics in Europe.
Subscribe to Newsletter