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International project

Enhancing radiation protection

A new EC-funded project will bring together medical and radiation scientists, physicists and clinicians to enhance the radiation protection of patients and medical professionals. The four-year MEDIRAD project, which kicked off in June 2017, is led by the European Institute for Biomedical Imaging Research – EIBIR (AT) and comprises a consortium of 33 partners from 14 European countries.

Latest headlines

FDA clears first 7T magnetic resonance imaging device

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration cleared the first seven tesla (7T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) device, more than doubling the static magnetic field strength available for use in the United States. The Magnetom Terra is the first 7T MRI system cleared for clinical use in the United States. Details at FDA.gov.


Siemens and HORIBA team up to expand laboratory hematology offerings

Siemens Healthineers announced it has entered into a long-term agreement with HORIBA Medical. The companies will collaborate in bringing new and innovative hematology solutions to the market globally. With HORIBA Medical as the original equipment manufacturer to complement the Siemens Healthineers portfolio, the companies will provide customers with expanded options to fulfill their hematology and multidisciplinary solution needs.

Cancer research

Researchers release the brakes on the immune system

Many tumors possess mechanisms to avoid destruction by the immune system. For instance, they misuse the natural “brakes” in the immune defense mechanism, which normally prevent an excessive…

Tracking-Pixel

UK study

Teenage girls more likely to self-harm than boys

There has been a sharp rise in self-harm reported in general practices for girls aged between 13-16 years from 2011 to 2014, compared with boys of the same age. In socially deprived areas, referrals…

Biomedical project

Saving hearts after a heart attack

University of Alabama at Birmingham biomedical engineers report a significant advance in efforts to repair a damaged heart after a heart attack, using grafted heart-muscle cells to create a repair…

Digitalization

Carestream introduces upgrade to DR

Carestream Health makes converting to DR easy and affordable with the launch of its Carestream DRX-Transportable System/Lite. The system equips facilities to convert room-based or mobile imaging…

Medical training

Supporting the next generation of doctors

Fujifilm SonoSite maintains its focus on supporting medical training and education, and recently supplied instruments for a series of ultrasound workshops at the Doctors Academy International Medical…

Cancer research

Esophageal cancer “cell of origin” identified

Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have identified cells in the upper digestive tract that can give rise to Barrett’s esophagus, a precursor to esophageal cancer. The discovery…

Research project

Can new molecular imaging technology guide prostate cancer surgery?

The Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI) announced that it has received funding from the Dutch Cancer Society to test whether a novel molecular imaging technology can guide prostate cancer surgery. The…

Research discovery

New blood test may diagnose breast cancer

In a potential major breakthrough in breast cancer research, scientists at the Center for Translational Cancer Research (CTCR) at the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center & Research Institute of…

Laboratory operations

Atellica NEPH 630 System now available

Siemens Healthineers announced its Atellica NEPH 630 System is now available to laboratories. The Atellica NEPH 630 System is a low- to mid-volume nephelometric protein testing solution that…

Prenatal care

Fever itself in early pregnancy might cause birth defects

Duke researchers now have evidence to suggest the fever itself, not its root source, could interfere with the development of the heart and jaw during the first three to eight weeks of pregnancy.…

Tumor analysis

Immune response to ovarian cancer may predict survival

A group of international cancer researchers led by investigators from Mayo Clinic and University of New South Wales Sydney has found that the level of a type of white blood cell, called…

Pediatrics study

Higher vitamin D dose increases bone density in premature babies

Results of a University of Nebraska Medical Center study found if the standard supplementation of 400 IUs of vitamin D is increased to 800 IUs daily there are reductions in the number of premature…

Study

Relaxing proteins may prevent dysfunction and disease

For many years, we thought that all proteins must fold into complicated shapes to fulfill their functions, looking like thousands of sets of custom-tailored locks and keys. But over the past two…

Study

Risk factors on rise among people with stroke

Despite prevention efforts, researchers have found a significant increase over a 10-year period in the percentage of people with stroke who have high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking and other risk…

Intraoperative molecular imaging

Tumor dye makes cancerous lymph nodes glow during surgery

Surgeons at Penn Medicine are using a fluorescent dye that makes cancerous cells glow in hopes of identifying suspicious lymph nodes during head and neck cancer procedures. Led by Jason G. Newman,…

Side effects

Do common acid reflux medications promote chronic liver disease?

Approximately 10 percent of the general population take a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) drug to block stomach acid secretions and relieve symptoms of frequent heartburn, acid reflux and…

Brain disease

Risks – and benefits – of the Alzheimer’s gene

Scientists drilling down to the molecular roots of Alzheimer’s disease have encountered a good news/bad news scenario. A major player is a gene called TREM2, mutations of which can substantially…

Biology of Ageing

Road map to a longer life

In old age a variety of cellular processes decline and the risk to develop age-related diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s or Diabetes increases dramatically. But does ageing affect all…

Research network

40% of women with breast cancer live in Asia

The Breast International Group (BIG), an international not-for-profit organisation that represents the largest global network of academic research groups dedicated to finding cures for breast cancer,…

Study

How to decrease the discard rate of donated organs

A new study indicates that many donated organs that are discarded might be suitable for transplantation if certain steps are taken to limit damage following donation. The findings appear in an…

Medication quality

No clear evidence that most new cancer drugs extend or improve life

The majority of cancer drugs approved in Europe between 2009 and 2013 entered the market without clear evidence that they improved survival or quality of life for patients, finds a study published by…

Medical imaging

DICOM - a reality in digital pathology workflows

Just as for other medical fields, DICOM is expected to play a significant role in pathology as a universal and fundamental standard in digital medical imaging. The value chain of solution components…

Cell signals

Wound healing: more complex than you think

In a sharp and pointy world, wound healing is a critical and marvelous process. Despite a tremendous amount of scientific study, many outstanding mysteries still surround the way in which cells in…

Smoking study

Years of life could be saved if smokers switched to e-cigarettes

Up to 6.6 million premature deaths could be prevented in the US if smokers switched to e-cigarettes over a ten year period, suggests a study published in Tobacco Control, and those smokers who…

Predicting cognitive decline

Odor identification problems may be a warning bell for dementia

A long-term study of nearly 3,000 adults, aged 57 to 85, found that those who could not identify at least four out of five common odors were more than twice as likely as those with a normal sense of…

Cardiac injury

Could this be the way to mend a broken heart?

Early research results suggest scientists might be on to a way to preserve heart function after heart attacks or for people with inherited heart defects called congenital cardiomyopathies.

Breast cancer

Aggressive or slow-growing tumor? Contrast agent gives clues

A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent being tested by researchers at Case Western Reserve University not only pinpoints breast cancers at early stages but differentiates between…

Symbiotic cohabitation

Nerves control the body’s bacterial community

CAU research team proves, for the first time, that there is close cooperation between the nervous system and the microbial population of the body.

Neurodegenerative disease

Low magnesium-levels raise risk of dementia - but so do high ones

People with both high and low levels of magnesium in their blood may have a greater risk of developing dementia, according to a study published in Neurology, the medical journal of the American…

Superbug MRSA

Unlocking the secrets of Staph's immune bypass

For years, medical investigators have tried and failed to develop vaccines for a type of staph bacteria associated with the deadly superbug MRSA. But a new study by Cedars-Sinai investigators shows…

Vendor-neutral archive

Agfa and Luxembourg hospitals cooperate for national VNA

Agfa HealthCare and the Fédération des Hôpitaux Luxembourgeois (FHL) have revealed an ambitious cooperation: A national-level Enterprise Imaging platform will enable the cross-departmental sharing…

Recommendations

First European advice on deep vein thrombosis

The first comprehensive European advice on deep vein thrombosis is published in the current issue of European Heart Journal. The recommendations were produced by the European Society of Cardiology…

Pulmonary diseases

Treating asthma or COPD with steroid inhaler is a risky endeavour

Older people who use steroid inhalers for asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are more likely to suffer particular bacterial infections, according to a large study published in the…

Clinical collaboration platform

Carestream demonstrates AI tools on at SIIM machine learning showcase

Carestream Health is demonstrating advanced imaging analytics software tools designed to enhance value in the delivery of medical care as part of its Clinical Collaboration Platform at the SIIM…

Stereotactic beam scanning

IBA releases the world’s smallest ionization chamber

With its beam quality independent characteristic and the spherical shape of its active volume, the RAZOR Nano Chamber is the latest highlight for small field dosimetry at IBA.

TrueVue

Philips ultrasound innovations provide lifelike 3D images

Philips TrueVue, GlassVue, aReveal A.I. and TouchVue improve workflow and diagnostic confidence, enhancing the connection between clinicians and their patients.

Blood brain barrier

A new approach to conquer the 'fortress of the brain'

Scientists have helped provide a way to better understand how to enable drugs to enter the brain and how cancer cells make it past the blood brain barrier.

‘Global General Radiography Product Line Strategy Leadership Award 2017’

Shimadzu achieves Frost & Sullivan award

Shimadzu, a worldwide leading manufacturer of diagnostic imaging equipment, achieved the ‘Global General Radiography Product Line Strategy Leadership Award 2017’.

Phosphatidic acid phosphatase

A fat-regulating enzyme could hold the key to obesity and diseases

It had already been known that the enzyme known as phosphatidic acid phosphatase plays a crucial role in regulating the amount of fat in the human body. Controlling it is therefore of interest in the…

Synthetic biology

Apps, downloads, virtual machines: 'Programming' cells to fight disease

Cells can be programmed like a computer to fight cancer, influenza, and other serious conditions – thanks to a breakthrough in synthetic biology by the University of Warwick.

Prenatal cardiology

Ultra-early ultrasound can detect foetal cardiac defects

Study shows a simplified examination can be performed routinely on low-risk populations during the first trimester of pregnancy.

Perinatology

Diagnostics and treatment of congenital heart defects

Today, many congenital heart defects can be diagnosed in the unborn child – and even treated in utero. Monique Haak (46), gynaecologist-perinatologist and fetal surgeon at Leids University Medical…

Congenital heart defects

All unborn babies need foetal echocardiography

Acknowledging the need for faster ultrasound automation, Dr Alexander Weichert explained how automated procedures can assist in the early detection of cardiovascular disease and prenatal dia­gnostic…

Neurodegeneration

Scientists discover genetic timetable of brain's aging process

Brain scientists from Edinburgh have identified a genetic programme that controls the way our brain changes throughout life. The programme controls how and when brain genes are expressed at different…

Therapy study

Vaccine and medication might stop Alzheimer’s years before it begins

Researchers at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) are tackling Alzheimer’s disease with a new study that intervenes decades before the disease develops.

Algorithmic tool

Google screens for depression - is that really a good thing?

With one in five Americans experiencing clinical depression in their lifetime, should Google offer an online screening test for depression? US based clinical psychiatrist Ken Duckworth says providing…

Bone thinning

Largest ever genetic study marks likely osteoporosis treatment target

Scientists are honing in on a potential treatment for osteoporosis, after performing the largest ever genetic study of the common age-related bone-thinning disease.

Cinematic Rendering

Siemens visualization experts nominated for 2017 German Future Prize

Siemens Healthineers employees Dr. Klaus Engel and Dr. Robert Schneider have been nominated for the German Future Prize along with Professor Franz Fellner, MD, for the development of the…

Tomosynthesis

Hologic’s 3Dimensions mammography system now available in Europe

Hologic, Inc. announced that the 3Dimensions mammography system, the fastest, highest resolution breast tomosynthesis system ever, is available for purchase in Europe.

Radiopharmaceutical tracers

Diagnosing and treating tumors with radioactive metal complexes

A team under the direction of chemist Prof. Dr Peter Comba is investigating radioactive metal complexes for use in the diagnosis and treatment of tumors.

Transmission prevention

One-two punch against malaria

Combining a new compound with old drugs could provide an effective remedy against malaria and drug-resistant parasites.

New diagnostic system

Painting for Parkinson's

Researchers have developed an automated and affordable system to diagnose early-stage Parkinson’s disease through a simple drawing task.

"FRAiL" study

New assessment predicts fracture risk for patients in long-term care

Researchers from Hebrew SeniorLife's Institute for Aging Research have developed and validated a new assessment to predict the risk of falls in long-term care patients.

Circulation

Can height increase risk for blood clots in veins?

The taller you are, the more likely you may be to develop blood clots in the veins, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics.

Handheld mass spectrometer

This pen may be mightier than cancer

A team of scientists and engineers at The University of Texas at Austin has invented a powerful tool that rapidly and accurately identifies cancerous tissue during surgery, delivering results in…

Cell biology

Improved stem cell transplantation may be on the horizon

Researchers in Germany have demonstrated that hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplants can be improved by treatments that temporarily prevent the stem cells from dying.

Perception research

Why do we see colors the way we do?

Dr. Wolf M. Harmening from University Eye Hospital Bonn, together with American colleagues, studied color vision by probing individual sensory cells – photoreceptors – in the human eye. The…

Research subjects

Mice and men - not as equal as medicine would like to think

The mouse is the most widely used model organism to understand human genetics, biology, and diseases in the research setting. But new research findings have revealed important divergences between the…

Cardiology

Is your walking pace a predictor of heart-related deaths?

A new study suggests that middle-aged people who report that they are slow walkers could be at higher risk of heart disease compared to the general population.

Substance exchange

Shuttling proteins work like a revolving door

New research reveals how shuttling proteins known as importins control the function of nuclear pores. An insight that could help in the fight against cancer.

Neurology

Biologists find new source for brain’s development

A team of biologists has found an unexpected source for the brain’s development, a finding that offers new insights into the building of the nervous system.

Recovery

Stroke patient improvement with a brain-computer interface

University of Adelaide researchers have shown that it is possible for stroke patients to improve motor function using special training involving connecting brain signals with a computer.

OnSight extremity system

High-quality 3D imaging for orthopaedic surgeons

Carestream will demonstrate its CARESTREAM OnSight 3D Extremity System that uses cone beam CT (CBCT) technology to capture high-quality, low-dose 3D extremity exams at the American Society for…

Evolution of a field

Will software steal the heart of cardiology?

Celebrating 40 years of PCI, cardiologists fret over their future with big data, machine learning and robots.

Combination approach

Radiation treatment extends life expectancy for patients with inoperable lung cancer

Patients with unresectable, or inoperable, lung cancer are often given a dismal prognosis, with low rates of survival beyond a few years. Researchers exploring combination therapies have recently…

Health economics

Atrial fibrillation imposes a high burden in Europe

The first health economics data from the Global Anticoagulant Registry in the Field – Atrial Fibrillation (GARFIELD-AF) was presented at ESC Congress 2017, organised by the European Society of…

Extreme environments

Cardiology in outer space and Polar Regions

Cardiology in extreme environments takes centre stage at the British Cardiovascular Society (BCS) annual conference.

AI in hospitals

‘Radiologists are about to disappear’

San Carlos Hospital in Madrid has undertaken a number of projects to promote artificial intelligence (AI) use in clinical practice. Dr Julio Mayol, Medical Director and Head of the Innovation Unit,…

Autoimmune disorders

Allergies? Exhausted Regulatory T Cells might be to blame

Researchers have evidence that specialized T cells are vulnerable to exhaustion that may contribute to allergic reactions.

Neuron activation

Memories “Lost” to Alzheimer’s May Be Retrievable

Columbia University Medical Center researchers have found that it may be possible to access memories “lost” to Alzheimer’s disease, if their discoveries about memory loss in mice also apply to…

Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Developing a new active ingredient against chronic infections

Chronic lung infections caused by the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa require complex and, in most cases, long-term treatment with antibiotics—new medication is badly needed.

Cardiovascular diseases

Repairing damaged hearts with self-healing heart cells

Researchers discover a new molecule, ‘Singheart’, that may hold the key to triggering the regeneration and repair of damaged heart cells.

Professional standards

The role of sonographers: future professionals across Europe?

Ultrasound is often the first line of imaging used in the diagnostic pathway of a patient’s journey into hospital. Additionally, the increased prevalence of chronic conditions and changes in the…

Backlog I

A worrying age increase of imaging equipment

A recent Medical Imaging Equipment Age Profile report from AXREM provides worrying reading. The report highlights the continuing increase in the age of the installed base of medical imaging equipment…

Backlog II

Ten percent of radiology scanners should be scrapped

One in ten CT scanners and one in five MRI scanners are technically obsolete. The European Society of Radiology (ESR) is sounding the alarm.

Backlog III

‘One in three scanners are obsolete’

Obsolescence and strategies to manage equipment data to benefit patients were at the centre of debates during the Radiology Triangle meeting in Madrid earlier this year.

Light microscopy

An image is worth a thousand words

Light microscopy today offers a wealth of techniques that provide fascinating insights into life on subcellular level. “In light microscopy these days there are so many new techniques that each of…

Medication testing

The birth of the amazing organoids

Professor Hans Clevers, researcher and group leader at the Hubrecht Institute in Utrecht, the Netherlands, invented the organoids, a ground-breaking new technique to grow new ‘organs’ and to test…

Rheumatoid arthritis

Hibernation causes inflammation

A research team found that in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, a special cell population called innate lymphoid cells are in a state of hibernation which is why these patients suffer…

Multimodality imaging

Algorithms define prosthetic valve dysfunction

Cardiologists have highlighted the importance of all imaging modalities – including echocardiography and cardiac CT – to evaluate prosthetic heart valves in a new series of recommendations.…