Keyword: microscopy

Photo

In focus

Universal algorithm set to boost microscopes

Scientists from EPFL have developed an algorithm that can determine whether a super-resolution microscope is operating at maximum resolution based on a single image. The method is compatible with all types of microscopes and could one day be a standard feature of automated models. Thanks to the advent of super-resolution microscopes some 30 years ago, scientists can observe subcellular…

Photo

Collagen unter the microscope

Seeing the pattern beneath the skin

As the largest organ of the human body, our skin is astounding. It protects us from infection, endures radiation, senses temperature, and is flexible enough to withstand our everyday activities. What holds this all together is the protein we all know and love: collagen. In a paper published in Scientific Reports a team from Japan found for the first time that collagen in the skin is organized in…

Photo

WLAN-capability

Turning microscopes in the classroom into a wireless imaging system

Today’s educational landscape is changing rapidly thanks to technological advances. Introducing wireless capabilities to science classrooms enables lecturers to teach and students to learn in an engaging digital environment that promotes teamwork. Equipped with a WLAN-capable Olympus EP50 camera, every microscope in a classroom becomes a wireless imaging system. Using its own WLAN signal*, the…

Photo

Photonics

Rapid tissue analysis: Laser light detects tumors

Cancer - this diagnosis affects almost every second German at some point in his life. It is the second most frequent cause of death in Germany. But the earlier the disease is diagnosed, the greater are the chances of surviving it. A team of researchers from Jena present a groundbreaking new method for the rapid, gentle and reliable detection of tumors with laser light at the leading trade fair…

Photo

Ultra-thin and polished

Next-generation objectives push boundaries of microscopy

Olympus has broken down barriers to imaging quality with the launch of its next-generation objectives. The breakthrough polishing technique enables the company to produce ultra-thin lenses that overcome the traditional trade-off between numerical aperture (NA), flatness and chromatic correction – enabling all three parameters to be significantly improved. Olympus has harnessed this proprietary…

Photo

Product of the Month

Make Your Application Digital – with the EP50 Stand-alone Network Camera

Bring your application into the digital world and combine the new Olympus EP50 camera with our wide range of microscopes. Add the accesoires you need and choose the kit that fits your requirements. The Olympus EP50 camera makes digital imaging of microscopy samples a fast and engaging experience and is ready to use in seconds. The EP50 camera adds sophisticated digital features to any microscope…

Photo

Microscopy in the body

The next generation of endoscopy technology

Biotechnologists, physicists, and medical researchers at FAU have developed technology for microscopic imaging in living organisms. A miniaturised multi-photon microscope, which could be used in an endoscope in future, excites the body’s own molecules to illuminate and enables cells and tissue structures to be imaged without the use of synthetic contrast agents. The findings have now been…

Photo

Non-invasive diagnostics

Detecting bladder cancer with atomic force microscopy

A research team led by Tufts University engineers has developed a non-invasive method for detecting bladder cancer that might make screening easier and more accurate than current invasive clinical tests involving visual inspection of bladder. In the first successful use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for clinical diagnostic purposes, the researchers have been able to identify signature features…

Photo

Smartphone detection

Spectrometry? There's an app for that!

Checking a lump for malignancy, finding out if food is fresh, just with your smartphone? It’s possible, according to Eindhoven University of Technology researchers in the Netherlands. Their recently presented spectrometer is small enough to insert into a smartphone. This device is not yet ready for use on a big scale, Professor Andrea Fiore, supervisor of the Eindhoven research team points out.…

Photo

Product of the month

Olympus Color Cameras – Confidence in Your Images

Let your images tell the story with Olympus’ high-quality digital color cameras for microscopy in hospitals. With crisp, noise-free images and 4K UHD live viewing, the Olympus UC90 and SC180 brightfield cameras capture all the details you see through the oculars – enabling easy on-screen viewing or sharing in large-screen presentations.

Photo

Product of the Month

Olympus BX46 microscope – Protecting operators with ergonomics

In microscopy, ergonomics is particularly important as long periods at the microscope put unusually specific constraints on posture. In certain roles, such as in pathology, microscopy forms a significant part of daily activities – sometimes taking up more than 50% of working hours. Protecting operators by preventing injuries is of utmost importance in these routine microscopy roles.

Photo

Competition

Olympus Image of the Year – Celebrating art in science

Olympus’ Image of the Year Award for light microscopy in Europe recognizes the very best in life science imaging. Inspired by the beauty and breadth of images submitted for Image of the Year 2017, Olympus is now continuing its quest for the best light microscopy art in 2018. For the chance to win one of three prizes, applicants can submit life science light microscopy images to…

Photo

Product of the Month

cellSens 2.1 – More Imaging for Less

Olympus cellSens 2.1 offers improved capabilities for flexible camera and microscope control and enables researchers to create sharp, noise-free images in less time. Helping to drive microscopy forward, cellSens 2.1 speeds up image analysis and features new image acquisition tools at a lower cost. In addition, existing cellSens users may be eligible for a free upgrade to cellSens 2.1. cellSens…

Photo

Nanoscale visualization

Laser light shows X-ray holographic images of viruses

Holography, like photography, is a way to record the world around us. Both use light to make recordings, but instead of two-dimensional photos, holograms reproduce three-dimensional shapes. The shape is inferred from the patterns that form after light ricochets off an object and interferes with another light wave that serves as a reference. When created with X-ray light, holography can be an…

Photo

Going digital

Time to speed up adoption of digital pathology

Early adoption of image analytical tools and artificial intelligence are crucial if health systems across Europe are to see the full potential of digital pathology, according to a leading expert. While a growing number of European institutions are beginning to embrace digital pathology, Professor Johan Lundin remains concerned about the slow pace of progress. He acknowledges that more…

Photo

Microscopy

New Olympus BX53 microscope with True Color LED

Olympus’ new BX53 microscope provides bright, sharp images with excellent color rendering performance equivalent to halogen lamps. The long-life LED light source, the True Color LED, is brighter and more uniform than a 100-watt halogen bulb – matching every contrast method and providing bright images to multi-head discussion systems for up to 26 people.

Photo

Time-lapse microscopy

Image correction software simplifies quantification of stem cells

Today, tracking the development of individual cells and spotting the associated factors under the microscope is nothing unusual. However, impairments like shadows or changes in the background complicate the interpretation of data. Now, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed a software that corrects images to make hitherto hidden…

Photo

Light microscopy

An image is worth a thousand words

Light microscopy today offers a wealth of techniques that provide fascinating insights into life on subcellular level. “In light microscopy these days there are so many new techniques that each of us can only handle a subset of them,” says Christian Tischer, scientific officer in der Advanced Light Microscopy Facility of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany,…

55 show more articles