Keyword: microscopy

Photo

Competition

Olympus Image of the Year – Celebrating art in science

Olympus’ Image of the Year Award for light microscopy in Europe recognizes the very best in life science imaging. Inspired by the beauty and breadth of images submitted for Image of the Year 2017, Olympus is now continuing its quest for the best light microscopy art in 2018. For the chance to win one of three prizes, applicants can submit life science light microscopy images to…

Photo

Product of the Month

cellSens 2.1 – More Imaging for Less

Olympus cellSens 2.1 offers improved capabilities for flexible camera and microscope control and enables researchers to create sharp, noise-free images in less time. Helping to drive microscopy forward, cellSens 2.1 speeds up image analysis and features new image acquisition tools at a lower cost. In addition, existing cellSens users may be eligible for a free upgrade to cellSens 2.1. cellSens…

Photo

Nanoscale visualization

Laser light shows X-ray holographic images of viruses

Holography, like photography, is a way to record the world around us. Both use light to make recordings, but instead of two-dimensional photos, holograms reproduce three-dimensional shapes. The shape is inferred from the patterns that form after light ricochets off an object and interferes with another light wave that serves as a reference. When created with X-ray light, holography can be an…

Photo

Going digital

Time to speed up adoption of digital pathology

Early adoption of image analytical tools and artificial intelligence are crucial if health systems across Europe are to see the full potential of digital pathology, according to a leading expert. While a growing number of European institutions are beginning to embrace digital pathology, Professor Johan Lundin remains concerned about the slow pace of progress. He acknowledges that more…

Photo

Time-lapse microscopy

Image correction software simplifies quantification of stem cells

Today, tracking the development of individual cells and spotting the associated factors under the microscope is nothing unusual. However, impairments like shadows or changes in the background complicate the interpretation of data. Now, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed a software that corrects images to make hitherto hidden…

Photo

Light microscopy

An image is worth a thousand words

Light microscopy today offers a wealth of techniques that provide fascinating insights into life on subcellular level. “In light microscopy these days there are so many new techniques that each of us can only handle a subset of them,” says Christian Tischer, scientific officer in der Advanced Light Microscopy Facility of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany,…

Photo

Microscopy

Watching molecular machines at work

When one cell divides into two - that is how all forms of life are propagated - the newly born daughter cells have to be equipped with everything they will need in their tiny lives. Most important of all is that they inherit a complete copy of the genetic information from their mother cell. If this is not the case because a wrong number of chromosomes – on which the genetic information is…

Photo

Microscopy

New Patents for Lightsheet Readout Mode in CMOS Cameras

Hamamatsu Photonics has been granted patents for their “Lightsheet Readout Mode” which takes advantage of the rolling shutter readout in scientific CMOS cameras. Lightsheet Readout Mode is currently available in the ORCA-Flash4.0V2 camera. The patents place Hamamatsu’s cameras in an ideal position regarding the lightsheet application and Hamamatsu will move forward on enforcing their rights…

Photo

BRIM

Technology helps ID aggressive early breast cancer

When a woman is diagnosed with the earliest stage of breast cancer, how aggressive should her treatment be? Will the non-invasive cancer become invasive? Or is it a slow-growing variety that will likely never be harmful? Researchers at the University of Michigan developed a new technology that can identify aggressive forms of ductal carcinoma in situ, or stage 0 breast cancer, from non-aggressive…

Photo

Digitisation

Pathology departs from a dark back room

A UK-based neuropathologist has highlighted how the digitisation of pathology will play a pivotal role in taking patient care on to a new and more efficient level. Speaking in a recent Webinar under the heading The Adoption and Benefits of Digital Pathology for Primary Diagnosis, Dr Daniel du Plessis also noted how the digital era would raise the profile of pathology and ‘bring it out of the…

43 show more articles