Musculoskeletal

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News • Muscle strength analysis

What a weak handgrip says about your health

Muscle strength is a powerful predictor of mortality that can quickly and inexpensively be assessed by measuring handgrip strength, researchers show in a new study.

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News • Fracture diagnosis support

AI software to help identify bone trauma at the point of care

Fujifilm partners with Gleamer to integrate an AI software called BoneView into its X-ray imaging systems to assist radiologists and emergency clinicians in the diagnosis of skeletal fractures.

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News • Personal preferences

Exoskeletons with personalize-your-own settings

To transform human mobility, exoskeletons need to interact seamlessly with their user. Now, researchers gave users direct control to customize the behavior of an ankle exoskeleton.

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News • RYR1-associated disorder

New approach to treating severe congenital myopathy

The diagnosis is rare, but devastating – children with congenital muscle disorders often never learn to walk. Now, researchers from Basel present a possible therapeutic approach for the first time.

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News • Genetic dystrophy repair

Using mRNA to improve muscle strength

An ECRC research team has introduced CRISPR-Cas9 into human muscle stem cells for the first time using mRNA, thus discovering a method suitable for therapeutic applications.

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Sponsored • Orthopaedics

Periprosthetic joint infection: a complex issue

Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) can be an enormous challenge for orthopaedists and trauma surgeons. Antibiotic-loaded bone cement is an important element in a prevention strategy.

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News • Negative volume segmentation

Novel 3D image segmentation for literal ‘jaw-dropping’

Researchers at the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech) led by Professor Dylov and their colleagues from First Pavlov State Medical University of St. Petersburg, Russia, have developed a brand-new approach to the task of 3D image segmentation — figuring out the contours of the constituent parts in a complex structure. While their so-called negative volume segmentation…

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News • Scaffold-free approach

Researchers create cartilage tissue out of stem cells

Researchers at the University of Southampton have invented a new way to generate human cartilage tissue from stem cells. The technique could pave the way for the development of a much-needed new treatment for people with cartilage damage. Cartilage acts as a shock absorber in joints, but it is susceptible to damage through daily wear-and-tear, or trauma from sports injuries and falls.

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News • Titanium-alloy knee plates

3D printing simplifies high tibial osteotomy

3D metal printing technology is producing personalised medical-grade titanium-alloy plates that perfectly fit individuals suffering arthritis of the knee. Engineers at the University of Bath’s Centre for Therapeutic Innovation (CTI) working with 3D Metal Printing Ltd, are using the TOKA (Tailored Osteotomy for Knee Alignment) treatment to improve the surgical procedure and fit of high-tibial…

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News • Orthopaedics

Iliac crest reconstruction: 15 patients recruited into GreenBRIC study

GreenBone Ortho, a company specialising in bone regeneration, announces that it has achieved its aim of recruiting 15 patients into the GreenBRIC study. GreenBRIC study is a prospective, open label, single-arm, First-in-Human clinical investigation, in male and female patients, aged between 18 and 70 years, undergoing surgery to correct bone defects using GreenBone Implant, specifically for iliac…

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News • Self-powered implant

New device to speed up bone healing

Researchers know that electricity can help speed up bone healing, but “zapping” fractures has never really caught on, since it requires surgically implanting and removing electrodes powered by an external source. Now, researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison have expanded on this principle and developed a device to speed up bone healing.

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Article • Implantation of cartilage or stem cells

Remarkable cartilage regeneration

Joint cartilage usually regenerates very poorly. The matrix of cartilage (scaffolding) contains very few cells in deep layers. Moreover, joint cartilage is highly isolated: there are neither regenerative cells in the immediate vicinity that could migrate into the site of the defect and trigger repair, nor vessels that could transport regenerative cells to the cartilage. Unsurprisingly,…

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News • New regeneration method

Healing skeletal injuries with synthetic bone

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden, in collaboration with colleagues in Dresden, Germany, have developed a way of combining a bone substitute and drugs to regenerate bone and heal severe fractures in the thigh or shin bone. The study, published in the research journal Science Advances, was conducted on rats, but the researchers think that the method in various combinations will soon be…

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News • Osteoarthritis research

New treatment target could halt knee cartilage degeneration

There is currently no cure for osteoarthritis, but a group of scientists believe they’ve discovered a method through which a simple knee injection could potentially stop the disease’s effects. These researchers showed that they could target a specific protein pathway in mice, put it into overdrive and halt cartilage degeneration over time. Building on that finding, they were able to show that…

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News • Muscle dystrophy

Duchenne: "Crosstalk" between muscle and spleen

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common muscle disease in children and is passed on by X-linked recessive inheritance. Characteristic is a progressive muscular atrophy. The disease often results in death before the third decade of life. Researchers of the Universities of Maynooth (Ireland) and Bonn have found a connection between dystrophic muscles and the lymphatic system in mice…

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News • Outstanding radiologist

International recognition for Dr Jamie MacKay

Radiologist Dr Jamie MacKay has achieved international recognition for his research using advanced imaging to help patients with osteoarthritis and other musculoskeletal conditions. MacKay, who is a radiologist at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital (NNUH) and lecturer at University of East Anglia (UEA), has been elected as a Junior Fellow of the International Society for Magnetic…

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News • Surgical material research

Patching skull injuries with eggshells

A bioactive polymer-ceramic composite for fixing implants and restoring bone defects in the skull was developed by an international group of materials scientists from the Russian National University of Science and Technology (NUST) MISIS Center for Composite Materials. An innovative composition of the material based on eggshell-derived bioceramic provides increased strength and biointegration of…

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News • Joint study shows

Endoprothetic risk: Metals from implants can accumulate in bone tissue

Using highly complex analytical techniques, a group of researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin were able to observe in detail how different metals are released from joint implants and accumulate in the surrounding bone tissue. Findings showed a steady release of metals from various implant components. In contrast to previous assumptions, this was not related to the degree of…

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News • Fossilised findings

Study shows: Even dinosaurs had cancer

A collaboration led by the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) and McMaster University has led to the discovery and diagnosis of an aggressive malignant bone cancer — an osteosarcoma — for the first time ever in a dinosaur. Examples of malignant cancers are very rare in the fossil record. The paper was published in the journal The Lancet Oncology. The cancerous bone in question is the fibula (lower…

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News • Congenital defect reconstruction

Pectus Excavatum: First-in-human trial of novel reconstruction scaffold

Medtech company BellaSeno announced the initiation of a first-in-human trial of its novel, absorbable soft tissue reconstruction scaffold (Senella). A patient with Pectus Excavatum congenital defect has undergone surgery at Princess Alexandra Hospital in Brisbane, Australia, earlier this month. The procedure was performed by Dr. Michael Wagels, Principal Investigator of the trial and Plastic and…

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News • Algorithmic enhancement

Improved MRI scans could aid in development of arthritis treatments

An algorithm that analyses MRI images and automatically detects small changes in knee joints over time could be used in the development of new treatments for arthritis. A team of engineers, radiologists and physicians, led by the University of Cambridge, developed the algorithm, which builds a three-dimensional model of an individual’s knee joint in order to map where arthritis is affecting the…

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