Sensors

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News • Ultrathin fuel cell

Using the body’s own sugar to power implants and sensors

Glucose is absorbed from the foods we eat and fuels every cell in our bodies. But could it also power tomorrow’s medical implants? According to a team of engineers, it might.

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News • Proof of concept

Tattoo-like sensors reveal blood oxygen levels

Silk-based material under skin changes color in response to oxygen, and in the future might be adapted to track glucose and other blood components.

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News • Multi-tasking

Wearable monitors glucose, alcohol, and lactate

Engineers have developed a prototype of a wearable that can continuously monitor several health stats—glucose, alcohol, and lactate levels—simultaneously in real-time.

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News • mhealth

Smartphone-powered microchip for at-home diagnostic testing

Researchers developed a new microfluidic chip with broad applications for detecting viruses, pathogens, bacteria and other biomarkers in liquid samples.

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News • Wearable

Robotic sleeve for lymphedema treatment

Microfluidic chip inflates and deflates balloons in a sleeve to promote fluid flow in the lymphatic system.

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News • IoT medical equipment tracking

Collaboration to realize smart hospital initiative

The University Medical Centre (UMC) Utrecht, The Netherlands, collaborates with Fujitsu to realize their smart hospital initiative, using sensors, tags and IoT technology provided by the company.

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Report • Subset of wearables

From the wrist into the ear – the potential of hearables

Progress in miniaturising sensor technology has opened up new possibilities for monitoring vital signs outside the hospital environment. A subset of wearables are the so-called hearables – in-ear devices that are well suited for long-term monitoring as they are non-invasive, inconspicuous and easy to fasten. Hearables offer two major benefits: their proximity to the torso and vascular system of…

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Report • Super-resolution miscroscopy

PEAR: setting nano-imaging in motion

Ever since the Abbe diffraction limit of conventional microscopy has been surpassed, super-resolution techniques have been diving ever deeper into the most miniscule details of molecular structures. We spoke with Prof. Dominic Zerulla, whose company PEARlabs is developing an imaging technique that sets out to push the boundaries once more – by looking at in-vivo nano-scale processes in motion.

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Report • Diabetes

Microneedles: Nano-sized, huge impact

Drug delivery, blood extraction, contrast agent injection – many procedures in modern medicine would be utterly impossible without needles. Despite the benefits, inserting pointy metal tubes into a patient also comes with several drawbacks. By downscaling the to micrometer-size, Japanese researchers open even more areas of application for needles, while bypassing some of the most important…

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Report • BCI

Quantum sensors for next-gen brain-computer interfaces

Connecting the brain with a machine has been a powerful dream of mankind. What used to be science fiction, from the Borg in Star Trek to the Matrix, has become mainstream thanks to Elon Musk and Mark Zuckerberg who have put their entrepreneurial commitments into the area of neurotechnology. Recently, Professor Surjo R. Soekadar outlined current and upcoming applications of brain-computer…

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