Study

Asthma and food allergies predictable at age one

Children at one year old who have eczema or atopic dermatitis (AD) and are sensitized to an allergen are seven times more likely than other infants to develop asthma, and significantly more likely to have a food allergy by age three. This new finding from the Canadian CHILD Study will help doctors better predict which children will develop asthma and allergies, according to a paper published by The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. It has long been known that infants with eczema or atopic dermatitis (AD) are more likely to develop asthma and allergic rhinitis in later childhood, a progression known as “the atopic march.” But predicting precisely which children with AD will go on to develop these conditions has been difficult.

Tracking-Pixel

Study asks neurosurgeons

How old is too old to perform brain surgery?

People sometimes joke that easy tasks are “not brain surgery.” But what happens when it actually is brain surgery? How old is too old to be a neurosurgeon? In a new Mayo Clinic Proceedings study,…

Fairs & congresses

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Possible vaccine in sight

A new strategy for prevention of liver cancer development

Primary liver cancer is now the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and its incidences and mortality are increasing rapidly in the United Stated. In late stages of the malignancy,…

Accountable care organisations

“Grave concern” over plans to allow US-style bodies to operate in the NHS

It is of grave concern that there has been no public consultation on government plans to enable accountable care organisations (ACOs) to operate in England, say experts in The BMJ. ACOs were…

Augmented Reality in the operating theatre

Virtual data merges with a real body

Medical Augmented Reality (AR) assistance systems overlay information onto a surgeon’s field of view. This technology is complex and expensive. Therefore, the procedure must offer a big advantage…

Latest headlines

FDA clears common blood cell count test

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) cleared a complete blood cell count (CBC) test that, based on its categorization, can be run in more health care settings, including physicians’ offices, clinics or other types of health care facilities, by a wider range of personnel (e.g. support staff). This broadened test access will allow for faster availability of results. Details at fda.gov.


'Healthier alternative' status of e-cigarettes challenged in new study

The study looked at immune changes in the airways of the lungs and has challenged the idea that e-cigarettes are less harmful to health than conventional tobacco cigarettes. In a paper about to be published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill report what they believe to be the first study to use human airway samples to examine the effects of electronic cigarettes. The airway samples from the e-cigarette users had markers of abnormal "neutrophilic response and altered mucin secretion," note the authors. More Information.


Deaths Rates of Liver Cirrhosis Exceed Those of 5 Major Cancers

A new study found that liver cirrhosis mortality is greater than that of five major cancers. The study, sponsored by the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver and the Korean Liver Foundation, was conducted in response to the low survival rate of liver cirrhosis patients and the need to design improved health policy regarding this condition. The researchers, from the Republic of Korea, estimated the mortality of liver cirrhosis and compared it to that of five major cancers: lung, colorectal, stomach, liver and breast. The study was presented at the AASLD Liver Meeting.

Let's talk about feelings

How emotions influence our internal clock

Just how it works is not known - but human beings have an internal clock which enables us to perceive and estimate periods of time subconsciously. A research team under Dr. Roland Thomaschke of the…

Medical technology for the world

Point-of-care ultrasound helps intercontinental humanitarian efforts

FUJIFILM SonoSite was pleased to support a Spanish medical team on a humanitarian mission offering critical medical assistance in Kenya, supplying a point-of-care ultrasound system for them to take…

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Cholesterol testing

Follow-up test reduces heart attack reoccurrence risk

If you have a heart attack or stroke, it’s important to get your “bad” cholesterol measured by your doctor on a follow up visit. Researchers have found that one step is significantly associated…

Clever peptides

Biomarker may predict early Alzheimer’s disease

Researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have identified a peptide that could lead to the early detection of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The discovery, published in…

Hygiene campaign

‘Stand up for Handwashing’

Poor hand hygiene is a global problem. Washing hands with soap, under warm, running water is the single most important measure for preventing the spread of germs and infections.TEAL Patents – the…

Human papillomavirus

A vaccine against cervical cancer for poor countries

A novel vaccine against cancer-causing human papillomaviruses (HPV) is intended to help raise vaccination rates especially in developing countries. To this end, scientists from the German Cancer…

Widening the pool

Older donor lungs should be considered for transplantation

With a scarcity of lungs available for transplantation, the use of lungs from donors older than age 60 has been shown to achieve reasonable outcomes and should be considered as a viable option,…

Staying alert

Breast cancer recurrence risk lingers years after treatment ends

Even 20 years after a diagnosis, women with a type of breast cancer fueled by estrogen still face a substantial risk of cancer returning or spreading, according to a new analysis from an…

Predictive technology

New software enables early diagnosis of arteriosclerosis

Little exercise, fatty food and too many cigarettes – factors like these aid the onset of arterial calcification, also known as arteriosclerosis. If blood can no longer be pumped through arteries…

Deafness reversal

Inner ear stem cells may someday restore hearing

Want to restore hearing by injecting stem cells into the inner ear? Well, that can be a double-edged sword. Inner ear stem cells can be converted to auditory neurons that could reverse deafness, but…

New technology in healthcare

Sectra launches vendor-neutral integration for machine learning applications

International medical imaging IT and cybersecurity company Sectra is launching vendor-neutral access to machine learning in its enterprise imaging platform. Sectra customers will be able to utilize…

Innovation

Novel Nano-CT magnifies tiny velvet worm legs

Computer Tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of…

Tracking-Pixel

It's in the air

Higher air pollution in cities tied to higher mortality

New research presented at APHA’s 2017 Annual Meeting and Expo examined the burden of air pollution and its association with mortality in Chinese cities. The study by researchers at Drexel…

Study

Mapping brain connectivity with MRI may predict cardiac arrest survival

A new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers found that measures of connectivity within specific cerebral networks were strongly linked to long-term functional outcomes in patients who had suffered…

Sertraline usage

Standard antidepressant may be ineffective with chronic kidney disease patients

A clinical trial involving hundreds of participants has shown that one of the most frequently prescribed antidepressants may not benefit millions of patients who also have chronic kidney disease…

ABC4 conference

Delaying breast cancer progression is key to sustain life quality

Patients with advanced breast cancer have a better quality of life for longer if the progression of their disease can be delayed, according to new results presented at the Advanced Breast Cancer…

ABC4 II

Advanced breast cancer: Excercising is vital

Taking part in regular exercise can reduce fatigue and pain, and improve cardiovascular health and quality of life in women being treated for advanced breast cancer, according to new research…

Tracking-Pixel

ABC4 III

Combined therapies increase adverse side effects

Patients with advanced breast cancer who are treated with a combination of drugs that target specific molecules important for cancer development and also the hormones that are driving it are at…

Neurotransmissions

Nanosensors uncloak the mysteries of brain chemistry

Nanosensors are incredible information-gathering tools for myriad applications, including molecular targets such as the brain. Neurotransmitter molecules govern brain function through chemistry found…

Mammography

Hologic and Tromp Medical to provide systems for Dutch Breast Cancer Screening

Hologic, Inc. announced that it will provide all mammography systems for the Dutch Breast Cancer Screening Program in partnership with Tromp Medical, Hologic’s distributor in the Netherlands. Under…

The AßC of diabetes

Smart artificial beta cells could lead to new diabetes treatment

Treating type 1 diabetes and some cases of type 2 diabetes has long required painful and frequent insulin injections or a mechanical insulin pump for insulin infusion. But researchers from the…

Virus spread

Flu forecasting tool uses evolution to make earlier predictions

Each year, public health officials monitor the spread of influenza to identify which flu strains need to go into that year’s vaccines and where outbreaks will occur. But it can be difficult to…

Point-of-care ultrasound

Gambian trip offers dialysis hope

Point-of-care ultrasound is a valuable tool for successful dialysis fistula surgery, allowing pre-operative mapping to find a suitable site and post-operative fistula scanning to check for stenosis…

Increased operating time

Robot-assisted surgery not always faster

A Stanford study of nearly 24,000 patients with kidney cancer concluded that robot-assisted laparoscopic surgeries are associated with increases in operating times and cost compared with conventional…

Protein quality control system

Cellular power outage

A common feature of neurodegenerative diseases are deposits of aggregated proteins in the patient's cells that cause damage to cellular functions. Scientists report that, even in normal cells,…

Shareconomy

App accelerates first responders’ deployment

Point-of-care diagnostics (POC) has been established for 20 years. Comprehensive smartphone coverage and ‘shareconomy’ technology are now helping to push the development from previous business…

IT solutions

Big data: Utilising potential where it presents itself

Useful IT tools are abundant in today’s laboratories – ranging from software to evaluate analyses to specialist software for quality control, and middleware linking different devices. However,…

Nantes CHU

A hospital designed to fit 21st century medicine

21st century challenges are multitudinous for all. Ageing populations, a changing disease burden; increasing obesity with associated morbidities – Type 2 diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular…

Regeneration

Immune cells help rebuild damaged nerves

Immune cells are normally associated with fighting infection but in a new study, scientists have discovered how they also help the nervous system clear debris, making way for nerve regeneration after…

Handheld devices

Is 'Bring your own ultrasound' really such a good thing?

Pocket ultrasound accelerates diagnosis at the point-of-care reducing the role of the radiologist. You can buy a pocket ultrasound probe online, download an app to your smart phone and start making…

Russian biotechnology

Biocad prepares to enter the European market

The Russian biotechnology company Biocad plans to enter the European market with oncological and autoimmune medicines. So far, there are seven molecules in the European portfolio of Biocad. The…

Californian study

Exposure to glyphosate increased over 23 years

Analyzing samples from a prospective study, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers found that human exposure to glyphosate, a chemical widely found in weed killers, has…

Antibiotic resistance

A strain of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli is on the rise

Antibiotic resistant bacteria lead to infections that are difficult to treat, particularly in hospitals. Multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli bacteria which have developed special enzymes that render…

Swedish study

Blood-thinning drugs appear to protect against dementia

Blood-thinning drugs not only reduce the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) but are also associated with a significant reduction in the risk of dementia, according to new…

Scientific congress

ECR: Not just for radiologists

The European Congress of Radiology (ECR) has long been regarded as the annual scientific meeting for radiologists. However, it is also the official scientific congress for medical imaging of the…

Nationwide cohort study

Can an aspirin a day keep liver cancer away?

A new study presented this week at The Liver Meeting held by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases found that daily aspirin therapy was significantly associated with a reduced risk…

Early diagnostics

Sixty-five new genetic risk markers for breast cancer discovered

Until now, familial breast cancer has only partly been linkable to genetic risk markers. In a worldwide joint effort, researchers have now identified further genetic variants that affect the risk for…

EANM 2017

Siemens Healthineers Debuts Biograph Vision PET/CT System

At the 30th Annual Congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), Octobre 21-25 at the Austria Center Vienna, Siemens Healthineers debuts the Biograph Vision, a positron emission…

Anesthesia

Patients overestimate postoperative pain

Patients significantly overestimate the anticipated amount of pain they’ll experience following surgery, which researchers say can cause unnecessary anxiety in patients, according to a new study.…

Mortality decrease

Newborns with trisomy 13 or 18 benefit from heart surgery

Heart surgery significantly decreases in-hospital mortality among infants with either of two genetic disorders that cause severe physical and intellectual disabilities, according to a new study by a…

Split transplantation

One Liver. Two Saved Lives

A new study found that increased utilization of split liver transplantation could decrease the number of children who die awaiting liver transplantation without decreasing liver transplantation…

Cell activity

Individual receptors caught at work

G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are among the "hottest” targets for the therapy of diseases such as hypertension, asthma or Parkinson's. These receptors are the site of action of many…

International project

Enhancing radiation protection

A new EC-funded project will bring together medical and radiation scientists, physicists and clinicians to enhance the radiation protection of patients and medical professionals. The four-year…

Cancer research

Researchers release the brakes on the immune system

Many tumors possess mechanisms to avoid destruction by the immune system. For instance, they misuse the natural “brakes” in the immune defense mechanism, which normally prevent an excessive…

UK study

Teenage girls more likely to self-harm than boys

There has been a sharp rise in self-harm reported in general practices for girls aged between 13-16 years from 2011 to 2014, compared with boys of the same age. In socially deprived areas, referrals…

Biomedical project

Saving hearts after a heart attack

University of Alabama at Birmingham biomedical engineers report a significant advance in efforts to repair a damaged heart after a heart attack, using grafted heart-muscle cells to create a repair…

Digitalization

Carestream introduces upgrade to DR

Carestream Health makes converting to DR easy and affordable with the launch of its Carestream DRX-Transportable System/Lite. The system equips facilities to convert room-based or mobile imaging…

Medical training

Supporting the next generation of doctors

Fujifilm SonoSite maintains its focus on supporting medical training and education, and recently supplied instruments for a series of ultrasound workshops at the Doctors Academy International Medical…

Cancer research

Esophageal cancer “cell of origin” identified

Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have identified cells in the upper digestive tract that can give rise to Barrett’s esophagus, a precursor to esophageal cancer. The discovery…

Research project

Can new molecular imaging technology guide prostate cancer surgery?

The Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI) announced that it has received funding from the Dutch Cancer Society to test whether a novel molecular imaging technology can guide prostate cancer surgery. The…

Laboratory operations

Atellica NEPH 630 System now available

Siemens Healthineers announced its Atellica NEPH 630 System is now available to laboratories. The Atellica NEPH 630 System is a low- to mid-volume nephelometric protein testing solution that…

Prenatal care

Fever itself in early pregnancy might cause birth defects

Duke researchers now have evidence to suggest the fever itself, not its root source, could interfere with the development of the heart and jaw during the first three to eight weeks of pregnancy.…

Tumor analysis

Immune response to ovarian cancer may predict survival

A group of international cancer researchers led by investigators from Mayo Clinic and University of New South Wales Sydney has found that the level of a type of white blood cell, called…

Pediatrics study

Higher vitamin D dose increases bone density in premature babies

Results of a University of Nebraska Medical Center study found if the standard supplementation of 400 IUs of vitamin D is increased to 800 IUs daily there are reductions in the number of premature…

Study

Relaxing proteins may prevent dysfunction and disease

For many years, we thought that all proteins must fold into complicated shapes to fulfill their functions, looking like thousands of sets of custom-tailored locks and keys. But over the past two…

Study

Risk factors on rise among people with stroke

Despite prevention efforts, researchers have found a significant increase over a 10-year period in the percentage of people with stroke who have high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking and other risk…

Intraoperative molecular imaging

Tumor dye makes cancerous lymph nodes glow during surgery

Surgeons at Penn Medicine are using a fluorescent dye that makes cancerous cells glow in hopes of identifying suspicious lymph nodes during head and neck cancer procedures. Led by Jason G. Newman,…

Side effects

Do common acid reflux medications promote chronic liver disease?

Approximately 10 percent of the general population take a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) drug to block stomach acid secretions and relieve symptoms of frequent heartburn, acid reflux and…

Brain disease

Risks – and benefits – of the Alzheimer’s gene

Scientists drilling down to the molecular roots of Alzheimer’s disease have encountered a good news/bad news scenario. A major player is a gene called TREM2, mutations of which can substantially…

Biology of Ageing

Road map to a longer life

In old age a variety of cellular processes decline and the risk to develop age-related diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s or Diabetes increases dramatically. But does ageing affect all…

Research network

40% of women with breast cancer live in Asia

The Breast International Group (BIG), an international not-for-profit organisation that represents the largest global network of academic research groups dedicated to finding cures for breast cancer,…

Study

How to decrease the discard rate of donated organs

A new study indicates that many donated organs that are discarded might be suitable for transplantation if certain steps are taken to limit damage following donation. The findings appear in an…

Medical imaging

DICOM - a reality in digital pathology workflows

Just as for other medical fields, DICOM is expected to play a significant role in pathology as a universal and fundamental standard in digital medical imaging. The value chain of solution components…

Cell signals

Wound healing: more complex than you think

In a sharp and pointy world, wound healing is a critical and marvelous process. Despite a tremendous amount of scientific study, many outstanding mysteries still surround the way in which cells in…

Smoking study

Years of life could be saved if smokers switched to e-cigarettes

Up to 6.6 million premature deaths could be prevented in the US if smokers switched to e-cigarettes over a ten year period, suggests a study published in Tobacco Control, and those smokers who…

Predicting cognitive decline

Odor identification problems may be a warning bell for dementia

A long-term study of nearly 3,000 adults, aged 57 to 85, found that those who could not identify at least four out of five common odors were more than twice as likely as those with a normal sense of…

Cardiac injury

Could this be the way to mend a broken heart?

Early research results suggest scientists might be on to a way to preserve heart function after heart attacks or for people with inherited heart defects called congenital cardiomyopathies.

Breast cancer

Aggressive or slow-growing tumor? Contrast agent gives clues

A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent being tested by researchers at Case Western Reserve University not only pinpoints breast cancers at early stages but differentiates between…

Symbiotic cohabitation

Nerves control the body’s bacterial community

CAU research team proves, for the first time, that there is close cooperation between the nervous system and the microbial population of the body.

Superbug MRSA

Unlocking the secrets of Staph's immune bypass

For years, medical investigators have tried and failed to develop vaccines for a type of staph bacteria associated with the deadly superbug MRSA. But a new study by Cedars-Sinai investigators shows…

Vendor-neutral archive

Agfa and Luxembourg hospitals cooperate for national VNA

Agfa HealthCare and the Fédération des Hôpitaux Luxembourgeois (FHL) have revealed an ambitious cooperation: A national-level Enterprise Imaging platform will enable the cross-departmental sharing…

Recommendations

First European advice on deep vein thrombosis

The first comprehensive European advice on deep vein thrombosis is published in the current issue of European Heart Journal. The recommendations were produced by the European Society of Cardiology…

Pulmonary diseases

Treating asthma or COPD with steroid inhaler is a risky endeavour

Older people who use steroid inhalers for asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are more likely to suffer particular bacterial infections, according to a large study published in the…

Clinical collaboration platform

Carestream demonstrates AI tools on at SIIM machine learning showcase

Carestream Health is demonstrating advanced imaging analytics software tools designed to enhance value in the delivery of medical care as part of its Clinical Collaboration Platform at the SIIM…

Stereotactic beam scanning

IBA releases the world’s smallest ionization chamber

With its beam quality independent characteristic and the spherical shape of its active volume, the RAZOR Nano Chamber is the latest highlight for small field dosimetry at IBA.

TrueVue

Philips ultrasound innovations provide lifelike 3D images

Philips TrueVue, GlassVue, aReveal A.I. and TouchVue improve workflow and diagnostic confidence, enhancing the connection between clinicians and their patients.

Blood brain barrier

A new approach to conquer the 'fortress of the brain'

Scientists have helped provide a way to better understand how to enable drugs to enter the brain and how cancer cells make it past the blood brain barrier.

‘Global General Radiography Product Line Strategy Leadership Award 2017’

Shimadzu achieves Frost & Sullivan award

Shimadzu, a worldwide leading manufacturer of diagnostic imaging equipment, achieved the ‘Global General Radiography Product Line Strategy Leadership Award 2017’.

Phosphatidic acid phosphatase

A fat-regulating enzyme could hold the key to obesity and diseases

It had already been known that the enzyme known as phosphatidic acid phosphatase plays a crucial role in regulating the amount of fat in the human body. Controlling it is therefore of interest in the…

Synthetic biology

Apps, downloads, virtual machines: 'Programming' cells to fight disease

Cells can be programmed like a computer to fight cancer, influenza, and other serious conditions – thanks to a breakthrough in synthetic biology by the University of Warwick.

Prenatal cardiology

Ultra-early ultrasound can detect foetal cardiac defects

Study shows a simplified examination can be performed routinely on low-risk populations during the first trimester of pregnancy.

Perinatology

Diagnostics and treatment of congenital heart defects

Today, many congenital heart defects can be diagnosed in the unborn child – and even treated in utero. Monique Haak (46), gynaecologist-perinatologist and fetal surgeon at Leids University Medical…

Congenital heart defects

All unborn babies need foetal echocardiography

Acknowledging the need for faster ultrasound automation, Dr Alexander Weichert explained how automated procedures can assist in the early detection of cardiovascular disease and prenatal dia­gnostic…

Neurodegeneration

Scientists discover genetic timetable of brain's aging process

Brain scientists from Edinburgh have identified a genetic programme that controls the way our brain changes throughout life. The programme controls how and when brain genes are expressed at different…

Therapy study

Vaccine and medication might stop Alzheimer’s years before it begins

Researchers at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) are tackling Alzheimer’s disease with a new study that intervenes decades before the disease develops.

Algorithmic tool

Google screens for depression - is that really a good thing?

With one in five Americans experiencing clinical depression in their lifetime, should Google offer an online screening test for depression? US based clinical psychiatrist Ken Duckworth says providing…

Bone thinning

Largest ever genetic study marks likely osteoporosis treatment target

Scientists are honing in on a potential treatment for osteoporosis, after performing the largest ever genetic study of the common age-related bone-thinning disease.

Cinematic Rendering

Siemens visualization experts nominated for 2017 German Future Prize

Siemens Healthineers employees Dr. Klaus Engel and Dr. Robert Schneider have been nominated for the German Future Prize along with Professor Franz Fellner, MD, for the development of the…

Tomosynthesis

Hologic’s 3Dimensions mammography system now available in Europe

Hologic, Inc. announced that the 3Dimensions mammography system, the fastest, highest resolution breast tomosynthesis system ever, is available for purchase in Europe.

Transmission prevention

One-two punch against malaria

Combining a new compound with old drugs could provide an effective remedy against malaria and drug-resistant parasites.

"FRAiL" study

New assessment predicts fracture risk for patients in long-term care

Researchers from Hebrew SeniorLife's Institute for Aging Research have developed and validated a new assessment to predict the risk of falls in long-term care patients.

Circulation

Can height increase risk for blood clots in veins?

The taller you are, the more likely you may be to develop blood clots in the veins, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics.

Handheld mass spectrometer

This pen may be mightier than cancer

A team of scientists and engineers at The University of Texas at Austin has invented a powerful tool that rapidly and accurately identifies cancerous tissue during surgery, delivering results in…

Cell biology

Improved stem cell transplantation may be on the horizon

Researchers in Germany have demonstrated that hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplants can be improved by treatments that temporarily prevent the stem cells from dying.

Perception research

Why do we see colors the way we do?

Dr. Wolf M. Harmening from University Eye Hospital Bonn, together with American colleagues, studied color vision by probing individual sensory cells – photoreceptors – in the human eye. The…

Research subjects

Mice and men - not as equal as medicine would like to think

The mouse is the most widely used model organism to understand human genetics, biology, and diseases in the research setting. But new research findings have revealed important divergences between the…

Cardiology

Is your walking pace a predictor of heart-related deaths?

A new study suggests that middle-aged people who report that they are slow walkers could be at higher risk of heart disease compared to the general population.

Substance exchange

Shuttling proteins work like a revolving door

New research reveals how shuttling proteins known as importins control the function of nuclear pores. An insight that could help in the fight against cancer.

Neurology

Biologists find new source for brain’s development

A team of biologists has found an unexpected source for the brain’s development, a finding that offers new insights into the building of the nervous system.

Recovery

Stroke patient improvement with a brain-computer interface

University of Adelaide researchers have shown that it is possible for stroke patients to improve motor function using special training involving connecting brain signals with a computer.

OnSight extremity system

High-quality 3D imaging for orthopaedic surgeons

Carestream will demonstrate its CARESTREAM OnSight 3D Extremity System that uses cone beam CT (CBCT) technology to capture high-quality, low-dose 3D extremity exams at the American Society for…

Evolution of a field

Will software steal the heart of cardiology?

Celebrating 40 years of PCI, cardiologists fret over their future with big data, machine learning and robots.

Combination approach

Radiation treatment extends life expectancy for patients with inoperable lung cancer

Patients with unresectable, or inoperable, lung cancer are often given a dismal prognosis, with low rates of survival beyond a few years. Researchers exploring combination therapies have recently…

Health economics

Atrial fibrillation imposes a high burden in Europe

The first health economics data from the Global Anticoagulant Registry in the Field – Atrial Fibrillation (GARFIELD-AF) was presented at ESC Congress 2017, organised by the European Society of…

Extreme environments

Cardiology in outer space and Polar Regions

Cardiology in extreme environments takes centre stage at the British Cardiovascular Society (BCS) annual conference.

AI in hospitals

‘Radiologists are about to disappear’

San Carlos Hospital in Madrid has undertaken a number of projects to promote artificial intelligence (AI) use in clinical practice. Dr Julio Mayol, Medical Director and Head of the Innovation Unit,…

Autoimmune disorders

Allergies? Exhausted Regulatory T Cells might be to blame

Researchers have evidence that specialized T cells are vulnerable to exhaustion that may contribute to allergic reactions.

Neuron activation

Memories “Lost” to Alzheimer’s May Be Retrievable

Columbia University Medical Center researchers have found that it may be possible to access memories “lost” to Alzheimer’s disease, if their discoveries about memory loss in mice also apply to…

Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Developing a new active ingredient against chronic infections

Chronic lung infections caused by the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa require complex and, in most cases, long-term treatment with antibiotics—new medication is badly needed.

Cardiovascular diseases

Repairing damaged hearts with self-healing heart cells

Researchers discover a new molecule, ‘Singheart’, that may hold the key to triggering the regeneration and repair of damaged heart cells.

Professional standards

The role of sonographers: future professionals across Europe?

Ultrasound is often the first line of imaging used in the diagnostic pathway of a patient’s journey into hospital. Additionally, the increased prevalence of chronic conditions and changes in the…

Backlog I

A worrying age increase of imaging equipment

A recent Medical Imaging Equipment Age Profile report from AXREM provides worrying reading. The report highlights the continuing increase in the age of the installed base of medical imaging equipment…

Backlog II

Ten percent of radiology scanners should be scrapped

One in ten CT scanners and one in five MRI scanners are technically obsolete. The European Society of Radiology (ESR) is sounding the alarm.

Backlog III

‘One in three scanners are obsolete’

Obsolescence and strategies to manage equipment data to benefit patients were at the centre of debates during the Radiology Triangle meeting in Madrid earlier this year.

Light microscopy

An image is worth a thousand words

Light microscopy today offers a wealth of techniques that provide fascinating insights into life on subcellular level. “In light microscopy these days there are so many new techniques that each of…

Medication testing

The birth of the amazing organoids

Professor Hans Clevers, researcher and group leader at the Hubrecht Institute in Utrecht, the Netherlands, invented the organoids, a ground-breaking new technique to grow new ‘organs’ and to test…

Rheumatoid arthritis

Hibernation causes inflammation

A research team found that in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, a special cell population called innate lymphoid cells are in a state of hibernation which is why these patients suffer…

Multimodality imaging

Algorithms define prosthetic valve dysfunction

Cardiologists have highlighted the importance of all imaging modalities – including echocardiography and cardiac CT – to evaluate prosthetic heart valves in a new series of recommendations.…