Multiple myeloma therapy

Finding a formula for blood cancer vaccine

Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have discovered a way to move precision immunotherapy forward by using genomics to inform immunotherapy for multiple myeloma, a blood cancer, according to a study published in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, in December.

This is the first study to experimentally determine which byproducts from the mutation of tumors (known as neoantigens) have the ability to provoke the immune system into recognizing and killing cancer cells in multiple myeloma patients. The results provide the foundation for using neoantigen-targeting strategies such as cancer vaccines in future trials for multiple myeloma patients. Multiple myeloma is a malignancy of plasma cells affecting 30,000 people a year.

Photo
Illustration of multiple myeloma

© Scientific Animations Inc.

Next-generation sequencing data was analyzed to describe the landscape of neoantigens in 184 patients, and researchers identified neoantigen-specific immune cells triggered by immunotherapy. Additionally, they showed an increase in neoantigens in patients who had relapsed myeloma versus new patients, which may indicate potential for greater immune responses to immunotherapy in these patients. The study also identifies common neoantigens between patients, which could lead to new vaccine therapies.

“Tumor neoantigens represent excellent targets for immunotherapy, due to their specific expression in cancer tissue,” said Samir Parekh, MD, Associate Professor of Oncological Sciences and Medicine (Hematology and Medical Oncology) at the Icahn School of Medicine. “Until now, there has been no direct evidence that DNA mutations induce neoantigen-specific T-cell responses following immunotherapy in multiple myeloma.”

Stemming from this research, co-author Nina Bhardwaj, MD, PhD, Professor of Medicine (Hematology and Medical Oncology) at the Icahn School of Medicine, and colleagues are pursuing a clinical trial investigating the safety and responsiveness of a personalized neoantigen vaccine for the treatment of cancers including multiple myeloma.


Source: Mount Sinai Health System

20.12.2019

Read all latest stories

Related articles

Photo

Interrelationship

Impact of COVID-19 on cancer treatment

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted virtually every aspect of cancer care and research– from introducing new risks for cancer patients to disrupting the delivery of cancer treatment and the…

Photo

BTK inhibitor vs. respiratory distress

Off-label cancer drug shows promise against severe COVID-19

Early data from a clinical study suggest that blocking the Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) protein provided clinical benefit to a small group of patients with severe COVID-19. Researchers observed that…

Photo

Cause for lack of immune defense against tumors discovered

Improving immunotherapy for cancer

Our immune system not only protects us against infection, but also against cancer. This powerful protection is based in particular on the activation of special cells of the immune system, CD8+ T…

Related products

Beckman Coulter – Access 25(OH) Vitamin D Total

Immunoassays

Beckman Coulter – Access 25(OH) Vitamin D Total

Beckman Coulter, Inc.
Beckman Coulter – Access Active B12

Immunoassays

Beckman Coulter – Access Active B12

Beckman Coulter, Inc.
Beckman Coulter – Access Procalcitonin (PCT)

Immunoassays

Beckman Coulter – Access Procalcitonin (PCT)

Beckman Coulter, Inc.
Beckman Coulter – Anti-Mullerian Hormone (AMH)

Immunochemistry

Beckman Coulter – Anti-Mullerian Hormone (AMH)

Beckman Coulter, Inc.
Beckman Coulter – phi (Prostate Health Index)

Immunochemistry

Beckman Coulter – phi (Prostate Health Index)

Beckman Coulter, Inc.