Mass spectrometry to analyse Covid-19 samples

News • University of Surrey

Mass spectrometry to analyse Covid-19 samples

Researchers from the University of Surrey are applying specialist skills in mass spectrometry to assist in accelerating the search for a Covid-19 vaccine. The team is taking ground-breaking techniques recently developed to deliver fast cocaine and heroin fingerprint testing technology and applying them to the analysis of test samples taken from Covid-19 patients.

The team answered a call from the British Mass Spectrometry Society, led by Professor Perdita Barran from the University of Manchester, for experts in this field of science to join together and analyse Covid-19 to help the wider scientific community gain a better understanding of the virus.

Surrey will be receiving samples from Frimley Park Hospital, with analysis starting immediately.

Dr Melanie Bailey, Reader in Forensic Analysis at the University of Surrey, said: “Like many people across the world, we want to do everything we can to stop the spread of this terrible virus. We believe the mass spectrometry expertise we have recently applied to rapid testing techniques for cocaine and heroin can be quickly applied to support our partners to develop a vaccine or therapeutic drugs that can ease some of the symptoms in Covid-19 patients.”

Professor Deborah Dunn-Waters from the University of Surrey said: “Monitoring the immune response to Covid-19 can help us to determine why some people get more poorly than others and provide important information for the vaccinologists to use.  We are glad we can contribute to the Covid-19 research effort and are extremely grateful to our amazing NHS colleagues at Frimley Park Hospital for all their help with this.”

Source: University of Surrey

17.05.2020

More on the subject:
Read all latest stories

Related articles

Photo

News • Profession pressures

Covid-19 pandemic triggered surge in medical staff intention to leave

Burnout, fear of infection, lack of support: One in three doctors and nurses considered leaving their job, or the healthcare profession altogether, during the Covid-19 pandemic, a new study shows.

Photo

News • Mechanistic subtypes

The telltale traces long Covid leaves in the blood

Findings from the largest UK study of patients hospitalised with Sars-CoV-2 infection show that long Covid leads to ongoing inflammation which can be detected in the blood.

Photo

News • Research on Sars-CoV-2 antibody response

Study: Coronavirus infections last a long time (but so does vaccine protection)

New study results explore the long-term effects of infection with Sars-CoV-2, and challenge the idea that vaccine immunity fades quickly.

Related products

Subscribe to Newsletter