Vitamin pills increase mortality

Denmark - Vitamins A, E and beta carotene, taken singly or with other supplements, 'significantly increase mortality' according to a review study released by the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group* at Copenhagen University Hospital. Their study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), did not find evidence that vitamin C could increase longevity, but did find that selenium tended to reduce the risk of death.

The Copenhagen researchers analysed 68 previous trials of the five antioxidant supplements, involving 232,606 participants, and say their findings contradict those of observational studies that claim antioxidants improve health. ‘Considering that 10-20% of the adult population (80-160 million people) in North America and Europe may consume the assessed supplements, the public health consequences may be substantial.’

The team reported that 47 ‘low-bias risk’ trials, with 180,938 participants, were ‘best quality’. Based on those low-bias studies, vitamin supplements were found to be associated with a 5% increased risk of mortality. Beta carotene was associated with a 7% risk, vitamin A with a 16% risk and vitamin E with a 4% risk. No increased mortality risk with vitamin C or selenium were seen.

* The Cochrane is an international network of experts who carry out systematic reviews of scientific evidence on health interventions.

08.03.2007

More on the subject:
Read all latest stories

Related articles

Photo

News • Unjustified disparities

Sensitive women, stoical men? How gender stereotypes sabotage medical pain treatment

Stereotypical gender notions can affect how healthcare staff treat people in pain. This, in turn, may result in medically unjustified disparities in treatment of men and women, or “gender bias.”

Photo

Video • Organ restoration

First successful regeneration of diseased kidney

In a world first, scientists from Singapore and Germany have shown that regenerative therapy to restore impaired kidney function may soon be a possibility.

Photo

News • Infectious disease research

Hidden bacteria increases risk of antimicrobial resistant infection in hospital patients

Carriers of a specific bacteria have a 14% chance of developing an antibiotic resistant infection with 30 days of hospitalisation, according to new research from Amsterdam.

Related products

Sarstedt – Low DNA Binding Micro Tubes

Research Use Only

Sarstedt – Low DNA Binding Micro Tubes

SARSTEDT AG & CO. KG
Shimadzu – CLAM-2030 CL (IVD)/ CLAM-2030 (RUO)

Mass Spectrometry

Shimadzu – CLAM-2030 CL (IVD)/ CLAM-2030 (RUO)

Shimadzu Europa GmbH
Shimadzu – LCMS-8060NX CL (IVD) / LCMS-8060 NX (RUO)

Mass Spectrometry

Shimadzu – LCMS-8060NX CL (IVD) / LCMS-8060 NX (RUO)

Shimadzu Europa GmbH
Shimadzu – MALDImini-1

Research Use Only

Shimadzu – MALDImini-1

Shimadzu Europa GmbH
Subscribe to Newsletter